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7/8 vs. 1 1/8 shells for beginner

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Bushmaster1313, May 22, 2009.

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  1. Bushmaster1313

    Bushmaster1313 Well-Known Member

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    Other than recoil and reloading costs is there a reason why a beginner would want to use 7/8 versus 1 1/8 shells?

    I would think that for a beginner the more pellets the better.

    Lou
     
  2. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    Use 1 ounce loads.
     
  3. Bushmaster1313

    Bushmaster1313 Well-Known Member

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    Highflyer

    Why 1 ounce loads?

    The recoil with the 1 1/8 is not a problem and I do not reload.

    Lou
     
  4. grumpyduck

    grumpyduck TS Member

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    7/8th or even 3/4th ounce 12 gauge loads will allow a new shooter to concentrate on form and fundementals as well as shoot more shots instead of being pounded by 1 or 1 1/8th ounce loads. Slowing the 1 ouncers down to 1000 fps or so would work well too.

    I use 17.5 grains red dot, claybuster CB-0178-12 wads (Win. 12L), Fio Primers - any mild one will work like Rem's, Win's, Noble Sports; Rem. or Win. hulls and #8 1/2 or #9 shot with either 7/8th or 3/4th ounce payloads. Using #9 shot there are 439 pellets in 3/4 ounce payload vs. 410 pellets in a 1 ounce #8 payload. For skeet and 16 yard trap you can't go wrong with that light load. As they progress, slip in some 7/8ther's and 1 ouncer's as the shooter progresses.

    Check out the link above and about the 5th post down for more info: http://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?t=130987
     
  5. grumpyduck

    grumpyduck TS Member

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    Bushmaster,

    If recoil isn't a problem then shoot away with whatever you can get. If you're looking for more pellets go from 7 1/2 shot to 8, 8 1/2 or 9 shot. Lighter payloads and slow velocities translate into less recoil, especially when coupled with heavier guns.
     
  6. Charlie Becknell

    Charlie Becknell Well-Known Member

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    I believe small kids should be started out with 7/8 oz. loads or even smaller gauges.. I taught my boy to how to hold and mount the gun with the little plastic toy guns. As soon as he picked up a real gun he already knew how to mount and hold it.

    Charlie

    PS He has already beaten me but I plan on betting better.
     
  7. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    More is better don't hold water in my views, especially with new shooters. Why? Nearly 100% of the new shooters begin with an ill fitting stocked shotgun! Sometimes with a field grade dimensioned stock too! Shooting a lighter shot pay-load will allow them to hold an ill fitted gun closer to the clay than a boomer load more times during a round. If more is better, a full 1-1/2 ounces of 8s would annihilate clays, if and when they were pointed in the right direction by the newbie? Light loads for my new shooters with more velocity and they break more clays liking the game even more.

    Hap
     
  8. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    When you see a beginner, particularly a youth, close both eyes and jerk the trigger, you can just about be certain that person will not continue with the game. I start adults and teens even with 7/8 oz of 9s and, of course, on the 16 yard line OR on stations 1 and 7 on the skeet field. They don't know I've brewed up the weenie loads and they concentrate on the instructions given usually with good to stellar results. Once they've conquered the basics and understand that recoil will not kill them, they are free to choose ammo and not rely on mine.....brreakemall.....Bob Dodd
     
  9. Bushmaster1313

    Bushmaster1313 Well-Known Member

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    I'm the 52 year old beginner

    I can handle the recoil of the 1 1/8's, especially because I am using the relative low velocity Gun Club 8 shot and compared to the 00 and slugs I am used to they are tame.

    I will keep in mind the 7/8's when I bring my kids to the club

    Good advice
    Thanks
    Lou
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    If recoil is not a problem, I would use the 1 1/8 oz loads. The only reason to use lighter loads I can understand is for recoil reduction. Shell sales at the shoots I have attended recently are dominated by 1 1/8 oz loads.

    Lou- Try a box or two of the lighter loads and see if you agree with me. Not everyone does.

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. psfive

    psfive Member

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    My son (ne's 15) shoots my 7/8 oz reloads for 16s and back to 22yards. My 1 oz relaods for 23 and farther. Almost no recoil. As Vern says the the frist time they out shoot you is a special moment is correct. But he does with 7/8 or 1oz when I am using 1-1/8 oz. I can't think of anything I'd rather be doing. paul
     
  12. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    I like to compare the deal with a rank beginning shooter to the fellow that brings home an 80 MPH boat; you know, blown engine in the back and straight through pipes, that draws about 3 inches of water. The fellow takes his young family out in that water rocket, shows them the unimaginable capabilities of the boat, and then wonders why no one wants to ever get in it again; especially the young bride who's never seen water but in a glass. Beginners in any new thing need to be worked into the new experience without any frightful moments. I don't care how strong and big Mr. testosterone is, he will, IMOH, listen and enjoy the first time out better with wimpy loads that still break birds.....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  13. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Recoil is always a problem! The more you get hit the less you want to continue.

    About 3/4 of the people who say recoil doesn't bother me have some sort of flinch which can be caught on video tape.

    If all you shoot is an occasional 25 or 50 targets the recoil is of less effect but after a day of 300 to 500 targets th recoil is what tires you out.

    Shoot what you want but don't say there is no effect to recoil.

    If your shooting at 16 yrds there should be almost no reason to have to shoot 1-1/8 oz loads but 8 or 8 1/2 seem to work best.
    Joe
     
  14. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

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    Recoil as felt by the shooter varies from person to person, a lot of factors are involved, such as the frame size of the person, weight, health, physical strenght, porportion, arm lenght, etc. Gun fit plays the most important part of felt recoil. Gun weight also helps tone down recoil. I have shot 20ga 7/8oz shells and felt like I have been kicked by a mule, where as a 12 ga trapgun with a 7/8 oz load feels like a popgun. I am 6 feet, 200 lbs and am very sensitive to recoil. Start a new shooter out with a proper fit, 12 gauge and a 7/8oz load. If it is a youth or a lady shooter give more consideration to an autoloader, such as a Remington 1100, Browinng Gold or a Winchester Super X2 or X3. Since I have switched from 1-1/8 oz loads to 7/8's for singles, doubles and 1 oz for handicap, my scores have gone up considerably and I don't feel the pain. Recoil pain will turn away new shooters and hurt scores. Start beginners easy and I can almost guarantee you they will stay with it longer.
     
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