1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

7 1/2 shot for cold temps

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by maka, Nov 25, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. maka

    maka Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2009
    Messages:
    379
    I also live in the badger state. Most clubs shoot white flyer bio's. I myself use 7 1/2 shot from Nov. on. I believe while sitting in the trap house they accumalated moister and thus freeze. Or at least become harder. My thoughts are that this possible because so many shooters using 8's only dust targets without chipping or breaking them. Especially in temps 32F or colder.
     
  2. phirel

    phirel TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,556
    maka- I have not tested the biodegradable targets for moisture absorption. They do have a sulfate in them that is water soluble, so water accumulation might be possible. But for water to freeze with sulfate dissolved in the water, it would have to get really cold. Pure water freezes and melts at 32F. But if other things are dissolved in the water, the freezing point goes way down.

    Pat Ireland
     
  3. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,003
    I'm sure Neil Winston would probably have a chart for it, but if you "feel" that 7 1/2's will break Bio targets better in colder weather, then by all means use them. I think it would take thousands of rounds for a comparison that has ANY statistical basis. Even then, it would be hard to determine unless you could examine all of the unbroken targets, know how many pellet hits the broken ones got, and have some way to "grade" the breaks. You'd have to take into consideration a large number of variables, such as the rate of spin, shot hardness, where the pellets actually hit, etc. I have my own theories on the subject, but I have no real scientific analysis to support it. Just my own personal observations and preference. I shoot mostly 8's, but will have some 7 1/2s for the mid to longer yardages in the winter. I'll use some 8 1/2s in the warmer weather also, but mostly for 16s and the first shot of doubles. They work great in some 7/8 oz loads for the 16s and Skeet.

    In a nutshell, if you could only shoot one size shot for trap, I'd select 7 1/2s. They will break any legal target made and work well for the longer yardages. If the Bio targets are harder to break, then I'd think the larger shot size would be an advantage.

    It's still the old question.....7 1/2s or 8s?
     
  4. Rvator97

    Rvator97 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    335
    "Same old question"....same old answer: It doesn't make any difference!!
    Trapshooters sure spend alot of time discussing the irrelevant! :) Walt.
     
  5. Jennifer

    Jennifer Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    463
    It's probably like recoil (it's perceived). So whatever you perceive to break the target better is the best size shot for you. J
     
  6. Model Number 12

    Model Number 12 TS Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2008
    Messages:
    622
    Would 7 3/4 shot finally settle this arguement? When it gets that cold I go ice fishing.
     
  7. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,734
    At what yardage?
     
  8. george vogel

    george vogel TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10
    I myself like #5's in cold weather,but when it get's in the teens & 20's I like #4s the best.Theres an old saying,lead shot is harder than pitch.If you hit them they will break.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.