1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

.45 reloads that are like . 45 factory

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by rickk55, Oct 26, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. rickk55

    rickk55 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2006
    Messages:
    64
    My .45 acp reloads will not allow the slide to close. I believe that the reloads are bigger in diameter than the factory loads. Should I just adjust the crimp die down farther? Or is there something else that I should do. I am loading on a Dillion square deal. Factory loads work perfectly in my 1911.
     
  2. Hammer1

    Hammer1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2010
    Messages:
    1,595
    .

    One commercial reloader uses a Lee die as the final die just for this purpose.

    He is reloading about 20 million 45 ACP a year using Dillon Super 1050 machines.


    .
     
  3. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,804
    Not much info . Your ammo should drop right into the barrel chamber just like the factory ammo. Is your sizer die adjusted properly? Crimp die should be adjusted down just enough to eliminate any bell on the case mouth. Don't bury the case into the bullet. Learn how to adjust the press, call Dillon.
     
  4. Jerry944t

    Jerry944t Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,860
    Location:
    PA
    Sounds like your rounds are too long. Use the plunk test whereby you take the barrel out of the gun and drop your new rounds in. The breech end of the cartride should be even with the barrel hood.
     
  5. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,481
    Location:
    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    I measured across a factory load with a digital caliper to get the diameter the mouths of my crimped cases should be when setting up my seating dies years ago.

    Ed
     
  6. Kevin Fleming

    Kevin Fleming Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2007
    Messages:
    449
    Rick, you have just discovered that crimp diameter is just as (maybe more) important as COAL when reloading for auto handguns.

    K
     
  7. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    6,262
    Most likely the final crimp die - as mentioned above, adjust it down to where you have a straight wall up to the case mouth. (no bell remaining) but don't over do it as you can buldge the case lower down.

    Another possibility that I have seen is guys using the wrong bullet diameter like .454" bullets intended for the .45 colt. Make sure you are using 0.451" bullets.
     
  8. capvan

    capvan Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Messages:
    1,032
    You need a shell gauge or whatever you call those. I have one for every round I load and check every 10th round or so.

    cap
     
  9. BT-100dc

    BT-100dc Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2008
    Messages:
    1,487
    I have had the same issue. A factory shell measures .473 when measured just below the bullet. When my reloads measured .475 or .476 the gun would not fully seat the cartridge (pain in the ass). My barrel chamber is tighter as it was a high-end target barrel that I purchased and I replaced the original barrel with this new barrel. The original barrel was more forgiving. Now for the solution: (1) add a 4th taper crimp die (no bullet seat) which is utilized after using the taper crimp bullet seat die; and (2)re-set the 3rd die (taper crimp bullet seat die) to provide minimal or no taper without shaving any of the bullet side as if you attempt to obtain the .473 taper with the 3rd die you will shave some of the bullet (esp. cast bullets) that resembles a hair fine ring. The 4th die will get you to the final .473 or .472 and you'll be in good shape. Make sure you have an accurate micrometer or caliper. On my loader I had replaced the expander die (RCBS) with a Lyman expander die that you can screw in your powder drop measure in the top of that die. With adding the 2nd taper crimp die (4th die) I still only take up 4 stations. This works for me. I use a piggyback system on my RCBS Rock Chucker. Hope this gives you some positive feedback. BT100dc
     
  10. Straight99

    Straight99 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2007
    Messages:
    336
    Buy 2 items. A Lee carbide die and use it to crimp just like the instructions say. And a Wilson cartridge headspace guage and use it to see if you have the right crimp. They will work every time.
     
  11. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    8,542
    Location:
    HELL, MICHIGAN
    What Jerry said. Your probably seating the bullet out a ____hair too much...
    If your using cast swc's you'll headspace on the bullet first...
    roundnose, on the case....
     
  12. federal paper

    federal paper TS Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2009
    Messages:
    143
    LEE FACTORY CRIMP DIE. NO TRIMMING,JUST ABOUT IMPOSSIBLE TO BUCKLE CASE.
     
  13. smoke-eater

    smoke-eater Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2012
    Messages:
    172
    Location:
    SW OHIO
    Since the mid 70s, I have probably loaded in excese of 100,000 rounds of 45acp shooting IPSC & bullseye comp. I have almost always used a tamper crimp die.
    As AveragEd says measure loaded factory rounds at the mouth of the brass, and set the die to not less than that but .002 to .004 more than that reading.
    Also when loading for a 1911 style, remove the barrel, clean well. Now while reloading, place a reloaded round into the chamber, the brass and hood (the rearword most part) of the barrel should be even, if not adj. bullet depth until they are.
    I hope you understand what I am trying to say. I have had very few feeding problems over the years, using this method. gary
     
  14. rickk55

    rickk55 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2006
    Messages:
    64
    wow, all great tips, thanks for sharing your knowledge. I am amazed at all the great ideas everyone have given me. Thanks again
     
  15. RobertT

    RobertT Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Messages:
    1,354
    The Lee Factory "taper" crimp die should get you there, do not roll crimp the case mouth. Go-No-Go gauges are available from Dillon. These allow you to drop a finished round into a gauge made to chamber dimensions. If it drops in your good to go.
     
  16. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    6,262
    All great ideas except he is loading on a square deal Dillon which uses dies specific to that press. Standard 7/8 x 14 dies don't work. But the SDB does have a separate taper crimp station that is adjustable.
     
  17. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    6,486
    You don't happen to have a bunch brass that was shot in a Glock do you? The unsupported part of the case will bulge in the Glocks and if you don't have a sizing die that can correct this you'll end up with the same problem. Glock brass is easy to tell, the firing pin dent has a very light impression of a "square" around it.

    The sizing die on the Square Deal may not be able to size that area of the brass (near the extractor groove)because of the mouth chamfer. This means either trade the brass away or find someone who can "properly resize" it for you. Good luck.
     
  18. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Banned User Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Messages:
    8,357
    Location:
    Nashville Tn
    Lee Factory Crimp Die. NOT a luxury on rimless auto pistol rounds.
     
  19. kolarshooter

    kolarshooter Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    Oakland County, Michigan
    I always use a "jesus" Gauge or a case gauge.
    Use your revolver cylender for
    stright cases. .38/.357,41,.44s.
    Dillon sells their brand and a few other depending on caliber.
    It will help you have better ammo and no jam's from bad reloads.

    Tom
     
  20. crusha

    crusha TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,762
    1. Get a cheap extra Swenson .45 barrel from Midway...about $40, chain it to your press & use it as a functional gauge to test chambering of your rounds before boxing.


    2. Big M Perazzi mentioned a good idea, the possibility that your rounds are too long & you are headspacing on the sharp edge of a bullet, if you're loading SWCs. (If it gets too extreme, you may eventually jam a bullet into the barrel so hard the slide will stick shut, and when you apply sufficient force to the slide to get it open, the bullet will pull out of the case mouth and leave you with powder dumped down the mag well and a bullet that has to be pushed out from the muzzle. Don't ask me how I know that...and always have a push-rod with you, just like a wad knocker when you shoot shotguns).



    3. If your bullets have wax lube, it can eventually build up in the chamber to the point where rounds won't go in. (Also cakes up in your seating die & eventually causes rounds to go short). Dry lubed bullets are the way to go.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.