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.45 or .50 cal Muzzleloader

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by midalake, Dec 18, 2007.

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  1. midalake

    midalake Well-Known Member

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    There has been some touting in the industry about .45 being long range. however I see less of these guns around. In the last cabelas they only offered one in that caliber. do any of you have a .45???? How do you like it???

    GS
     
  2. Joe Woods

    Joe Woods Well-Known Member

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    Before buying check availability of bullets & supplies . There is nothing wrong with 45 cal. It is just easier to get 50 cal. supplies.


    Joe Woods/Ontario
     
  3. Dove Commander

    Dove Commander TS Member

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    In some states, 50 cal is minimum. Check your gun laws.
     
  4. gun1357

    gun1357 Active Member

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    I have both. The .50 cal is much more versatile and the sabots give you a .45 cal bullet capability also. I haven't fired the .45 in years. IMHO Ron
     
  5. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    50 caliber stuff is universally available. 45 not so much. If I was just starting I would not consider 45 under any circumstances.

    I had a 54 and got rid of it for the same reason.

    HM
     
  6. Gargoyle!

    Gargoyle! TS Member

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    50. as one said before you can find supplies any wher for a 50.
     
  7. famill00

    famill00 TS Member

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    I had a .45 cal that shot balls only. I loved that gun...wish I still had it. Also, if you ever get the chance a little .32 cal is a blast to shoot. I had a neighbor that squirrel hunted with the .32 cal...if I remember correctly it was a flintlock. .50 cal is however the norm. You can buy the plastic sabots in bulk and then buy 240 grain JHP 44mag bullets to put in the sabots. It makes it cheap to shoot. I am guilty of having one (although I have never fired it), but I think that the inline guns should be outlawed. I think as far as muzzleloading we need to get back to the basics. A round ball out of a .45 or .50 cal is more than enough to bring down a deer. I think we often forget that we dont need to blow completely through both shoulders to bring down a deer...all we need to do is penetrate the skin and take out ONE lung...for those of you who bowhunt you already know that a deer with only one lung is good as dead.

    Forrest
     
  8. Hawkeye Kid

    Hawkeye Kid TS Member

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    I use a 54 cal. Most states req. a min. of 50 cal

    Hank
     
  9. zap

    zap TS Member

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    54 cal all the way!!!!!!!! 100 10 125 yards is or should be it on either but the 54 definitely hits harder esp. for elk or similar critters.
     
  10. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Please define what you mean by "long range" and if you are hunting (and what you are hunting) or target shooting.

    .45 conical bullets are better long range TARGET bullets than .50 caliber, because they have a better ballistic coefficient.

    The .50 caliber offers better 'knockdown' power for hunting, but long range for hunting with muzzleloaders is really a moot point.
     
  11. stskid

    stskid TS Member

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    I have all three calibers (.45, .50, .54) and by far the .50 is easiest to find supplies for. In my experience the .45 is more accurate when using patch and ball and the .54 was more sensitive to load combinations. If your going to limit yourself to one gun I'd recommend the .50 caliber.

    I should mention that all my rifles are the old "cap & ball" type. I don't have any experience with the "in-line" type.

    Rick
     
  12. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    The .50 cal is my choice.

    I have a side hammer Thompson Center Hawken in which I can shoot .490 round ball and a Ruger in-line 77/50 in which I can shoot a .429 cal 240 grain 44 magnum pistol bullet in a sabot. The in-line will shoot a 5 shot 2" group at 100 yards with a weighed charge.

    Old Daniel Boone and the early "long hunters" carried "Kentucky" Rifles of smaller calibers in the .32 to .36 caliber range. They did this as lead was heavy and the smaller calibers gave more shots per pound.

    It is pretty obvious to say that they were good hunters and trackers.

    Way back in the early 1980's when black powder hunting was becoming popular in Kentucky, a recommended load by our local Kentucky Conservation officer was 60 grains of black powder and a .490 round ball.

    This is a light load by today's standards but it got the job done. In the slow twist 1 in 66 inches barrel, too much powder would not allow the rifling to properly spin the ball and accuracy would suffer.

    A good friend took a nice 8 pointer with this load at around 50 yards.
     
  13. midalake

    midalake Well-Known Member

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    I guess when I heard of the big .45 push a few years ago, I guess it was about long range shots. My guess is due to the projectile weighing less? Also maybe as one poster stated they have a better ballistic coefficient. However when it comes to a purchase, currently there just seems to be a fade to .50. Maybe it is also due to so many guns coming out with magnum powder loads. Has anyone tried to push a .45 past say 150 yards??? I only really have two hunting locations here where I have a shot past 150. One doe I took this year was 110yds, with a round ball. That is about Max, I would want to push this load. Everytime I seem to try to increase the powder, the wider my groups seem to get. This tends to be counter-productive especially if trying to gain yardage?????

    GS
     
  14. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Well, historically, the .45 muzzleloader is THE most accurate long range caliber of this type there is. Before metallic cartridges finally displaced it, Creedmoor was ruled by .45 cal muzzleloaders, with ranges of 1000 yards. But note these are conicals, not patch and ball.
     
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