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410 reloading

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by maclellan1911, Apr 5, 2009.

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  1. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    ok I just started reloading 410.....is it me or getting a good crimp a PITA on 410! I'm thinking A fresh crimp starter and some decent hulls may help.
     
  2. redhawk44

    redhawk44 Member

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    I do not find the 410 to be that much more difficult to load than the 12/20/28 ga shells.

    On a grabber, the only problem I have is once in a while spilling a small amount to shot because the shot is so close to the mouth of the hull when it is rotated from the shot filling station to the crimp starter.

    410 hulls do not last as long as 12 or 20 ga. hulls and you do need the mouth of the hull to be in decent shape to get a good crimp.

    I like STS hulls in 410, but most shooters seem to prefer the AAs. I do not know why.....
     
  3. skeet100

    skeet100 Member

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    Jun 3, 2007
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    410
    Loading 410's can be a PIA for sure........

    Please don't ask how I know.
     
  4. skeeljc

    skeeljc Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    .410 crimps are not difficult if you have good hulls. The case mouths on Winchester HS hulls hold up the best. The older compression molded AA's are o.k for 4 or 5 reloads. The Remington STS hulls seem to loose their shape sooner.

    You need to close the case mouth quite a bit with the crimp starter. Having the correct volume of components in the hull is very important with the .410. This means using the right wad. I like the Remington SP-410 wad for Remington STS and Winchester HS hulls. The Pattern Control Orange .410 wad works well in the old Winchester compression formed hulls with the silver lettering. The old style AA hulls with the black lettering are shorter and do not load as well as thise with the silver lettering.

    Jim Skeel
     
  5. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    Mac, welcome to the world of 410's. LOL Yes, they can be a PITA for sure. But you might want to raise the crimp starter up so it justs starts the bend and puts a small crease in the crimps and let the final crimp close it up. This works well for me in the Win. HS hulls. I have loaded a small amount of STS's and did not have to adj. for them. Maybe a small amount on the final crimp. You will just have to fiddle around with them until you get the setting you like. It doesn't take that long. Just keep at it. It worth loading these little guys. Keep the tools around for the final adj. crimp,I find you need to adj. from old hulls to new hulls also. Good Luck and Break-em all Jeff
     
  6. ExFedex

    ExFedex Active Member

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    Initially loading the .410 is a real PITA. There are some powders listed that take up to much volume in that small hull. I use Win. 296 in AA and Rem. hulls along with the Claybuster model #CB1050-41 wad which is a clone for SP 410,410SC, and WAA41 wads. That wad will work in 2 1/2" and 3" hulls. It is not truly a wad as there is no compression like larger gauge wads. Its really just a shot cup so setting wad pressure at minimal is important.I use a MEC 600 and no larger than #8 shot. Somewhere in MEC's helpful hints it recommends raising the operating handle slightly so as to lift the powder/shot tube about 1/2" up off the wad before dropping shot. This will preclude the bridging effect by allowing the shot to free fall/flow into the hull space. If you should forget to do this then the 1/2oz. of shot will then unbridge when the reloader plate reaches the upper limit stops. This slight jarring will allow the 1/2 oz. to spill all over your reloading bench along with outburts of profanity in this house. Keep your shop vac handy. Things will get better and a good looking .410 reload is something to be proud of. Good luck.
     
  7. ljuticsscentennialpro

    ljuticsscentennialpro Member

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    Be sure to sort your hulls according to length, since the lengths can vary. Then adjust pre-crimp and crimp for the different batches. Also, I found that I didn't need as much pre-crimp as I initially thought. Make sure wads are fully seated. If you are using a MEC, The original metal crimp starters sometimes work better than the plastic ones. With 3" 410 reloading it may help to check your horoscope, verify the lunar alignment, say 1000 prayers and hide all sharp objects that you may otherwise use to inflict self-injury, before you start, because it is the most frustrating of shells to get consistent reloads. Bob
     
  8. olddrum1

    olddrum1 TS Member

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    I have a PW and a Mec in 410. My wife can tell from the other end of the house which one I am using. I got the mec with out the book, I will have to try raising the handle. thanks for the tip.
    CB.
     
  9. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    I definitely see a difference in the crimp of certain hulls. I load primarily AAHS's and it is a shorter hull than STS's so I separate them when loading. I use a Grabber and have learned that if you use powdered graphite in the shot tube you will not have as many surprises. If I have to load any hulls with 7 1/2s I use my 600 as I hate the spills of shot. Jackie B.
     
  10. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Remington hull, Remington wad, and 296 powder is a combination that works and lets you fit about 20 more # 9s in the hull. HMB
     
  11. BunkerGuy

    BunkerGuy TS Member

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    I hate the housekeeping issues with ball powder, as 296. Alliant's 410 powder in a Win HS case with the Remington wad following the Alliant recipe works fabulous for me and is consistent over the chronograph. As these things go, the barrel is pretty clean as well.

    - - Bill
     
  12. mike b.

    mike b. Member

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    Another note: If you get the bulging fronts, shorten the wad petals by a third or half.(I'd rather have a shorter wad than give up any of that half ounce of shot!)
     
  13. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    I was useing some older AA hulls. I think I will wait until I have more AAhs or STS. I was haveing a hard time getting the crimp starter to form decently. It is the older metal. previous owner had many waser for spacers and the crimp still seemed open to me.
     
  14. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

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    I had the crimp starter down low and was getting bad crimps. Much to my surprise, less starter was better.

    go figure?
     
  15. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    as said less starter is better and check the hulls I have seen 3/16 difference in same name and that will change from a bulged shell to a sunkin crimp
     
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