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.410 or 20ga for 9yr old daughter to start with

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by CLP101, Jul 31, 2009.

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  1. CLP101

    CLP101 TS Member

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    My 9yr old daughter wants to try trap and I have a H&R .410 which she has shot a couple of times and is comfortable with. I also have a 20ga SKB XL900 that she can hold, but am worried if she can swing it properly, and if it will scare her off. She is almost 5' tall and weighs 75lbs. with a thin build. Will the .410 be adequate to start her with? Which .410 trap loads are the best?

    Thanks,
    Chris
     
  2. sx1skeet

    sx1skeet TS Member

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    I would say the 20ga as she will brake more and it will make her fell beter about her shooting. Just use lite 20ga loads.
     
  3. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Load some 3/4 oz and it will not recoil. Started my boy at 8 that way.

    HM
     
  4. jm1079

    jm1079 Well-Known Member

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    A gentleman by the name of Leon Measures came up with a method of training young shooters how to shoot a shotgun. It is called "Shoot Where You Look" and the kit came with a book, a VHS, and a Daisy BB gun without sights. If you google "Leon Measures" or "Shoot Where You Look". you should be able to get on his website. I suggest you invest a few minutes on the computer. It may help you do the best for your budding trap shooter. FWIW. jm
     
  5. Chip Pitcairn

    Chip Pitcairn TS Member

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    .410 is for experts not beginers. She is little small for shooting a full round. Let her shoot light loads in the 20,but only 7-10 shots then break for a while.
     
  6. paul e. stark

    paul e. stark TS Member

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    Get her a 28 ga.
     
  7. mike b.

    mike b. Member

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    20 ga. for sure !!!
     
  8. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    I would look to see how she holds the guns. If the 20ga is too heavy, she might be leaning back in order to hold it up. Poor stock fit could also be a problem. I would probably recommend the 20 ga with light loads, since it will probably not recoil much more than the lighter 410. If the 20 is too heavy and she has trouble with the weight or fit, then why not start her right behind the trap house with the 410. You can lock the trap straight forward and get her used to the game. When she becomes a little stronger and used to proper form, then you can migrate her up to the 20ga, if she appears to handle it well. If it's painful and/or she isn't breaking any targets, it becomes no fun to do.
     
  9. moore5833

    moore5833 TS Member

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    Dont listen to the people about the 20. Let her shoot the .410. At her age its not about a score-its about the fun off the game. The other adult shooters with help her along. Its ALL ABOUT THE YOUNG SHOOTERS.we NEED THEM. Make the whole club visit fun. shooting-telling lies-have some good food. As i get older- i care less about the score,and more about my friends. Perry
     
  10. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    I started my boy with a .410 but I didn't squad him up at the 16 at the club. I got an adjustable Trius trap and threw slow birds that crested 40 FEET away. He was able to start hitting some and I increased the distance until he could use the 20 gauge and shoot at the club. It is pretty intimidating for an small child to line up at the club with all those big old trap guys.
     
  11. Mismost

    Mismost TS Member

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    +1 for the Leon Measures Shoot Where you Look program

    BB guns are cheap to buy and shoot. She can can have a ball while working this program and so can you and you can do it just about any where. It will teach her to look at the target and move the gun. You will be amazed at how fast she gets good and how small of a target she can hit....like bouncing hulls all over the drive way. Pretty soon she will be hitting tin cans thrown in the air....all the while learning good safe gun handling.

    THEN a 20 gauge auto loader would be the way to start her out. Ammo is cheaper and she will have a more usable pattern out there. The auto will eat up most of the recoil.
     
  12. Prescott Gene

    Prescott Gene Member

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    I would have to agree with Chip. the .410 is an experts gun. Even the Skeeters (Sorry)call the "Idiot Stick". You have to be very precise and it is way too whippy. She will get discouraged by missing. Light loads in a 20, or 28, would be the answer. I liked the idea of stopping when she gets tired.

    Lots of encouragement, and remind her the idea is to have fun. Make a big deal when she breaks one and Whoop and Hollar when she smokes her first one. Just be proud of her, how ever she does.

    No pressure, just bits of instruction between shots.

    It is fun to teach young shooters!

    Gene
     
  13. Don Steele

    Don Steele Well-Known Member

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    Excellent question.
    Please re-read Leo's response. IF you decide to start her out on a .410...by all means recognize and stay within the limitations of that calber which are VERY modest in experienced hands...let alone a beginner. Like many here, I started with a .410 single shot, but didn't "graduate" to even shooting Trius thrown birds until I had some good, general shotgun shooting and firearms handling experience under my belt. When I had demonstrated a modest level of competence and SAFE HANDLING ability with the .410 just shooting "stuff" ( cans, etc..)...my Dad let me carry the Rem. Mod. 31 20 ga. to the Trius trap line...and have at it. Those early Sunday morning shoots our Weimaraner Club held are some of my very best childhood memories. Breaking 4 out of 5 off the Trius with that 20 ga. remains as joyful a memory as ANY 100 straight I've ever shot later in life.
    This is a blessed time for you and your daughter...I find myself a bit envious. ENJOY...!!!
     
  14. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Forget the .410, what you have in the H&R is an accident waiting to happen. Yes, I know the exposed hammer break open gun is what just about everyone started with but the reason for that is because they are dirt cheap. Those guns are ackward to use and hard to shoot. There is a very well known trap instructor that is limping around today and still has a bunch of pellets in his foot from one of those .410 beginner guns.

    Get a gas operated auto(20 gauge or 12 with light 7/8 oz shells) and shorten the stock to where it fits then rebalance the gun by adding some lead to what remains of the butt stock. Start the shooting lessons with a BB gun or a .22 on stationary reactive targets, stuff that is entertaining to blast like rotten fruit etc. Add the shotgun to the mix for one or two shots near the end of the session. When the kid is comfortable with the shotgun, then go to the range and try a few straight away post 3 targets a few at a time. Always stop the shooting with the kid wanting to shoot more. Then have the kid sit on the bench and watch a squad of experienced people shoot. Kids learn more from what they see than what they hear.
     
  15. bjc682

    bjc682 Member

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    Go with a youth, 20 Ga auto. The LOP is 13" and bbl is 21". Great starter gun. Most small gauge single shot guns have a lot of recoil and will beat her up. I converted a Rem LT 1100 20 Ga to a youth size for my son and it was the best thing I ever did. We started with a Rem 870 Express ( pump ) Youth model 20 GA and the recoil was so bad he didn't want to shoot any more. Also, low recoil shells are available in 20 Ga. Some autos won't eject low recoil shells but thats not a big thing starting out.

    I would also recommend getting her in a youth shooting program whether its rifle or shotgun. She will have fun with kids closer to her own age and the adult sponsors and coaches will give her a better understanding and maybe a different view of the safety element that I'm sure you have already taught her. Good Luck, Good Shooting and HAVE FUN!!!! Bart
     
  16. Chip Pitcairn

    Chip Pitcairn TS Member

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    I forgot to mention, stay away from the Rem. 870 Youth Model. It's too light and kicks like a MULE. I quickly changed my son to a gas operated 12 ga. Beretta 390 with a shortened stock. I used a Cole spring kit and it functioned fine with Winchester Low Noise/Low Recoil shells. I don't remember how much shot they used. I have taken lessons from Leon Measures and recommend his system. It is very similar to the lessons I got in the 1960's from Lucky McDaniel. We started shooting washers tossed straight up with a BB gun.
    Chip Pitcairn
     
  17. M-16

    M-16 TS Member

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    No matter which gun you use it still has to be aimed correctly. Yes the 20 should have a bigger pattern, and I agree the HR's are a cheap cheap gun. I'd go with what ever gun fits her properly 1st and fore most.
     
  18. shadow

    shadow Active Member

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    Damn shame they dont make the "Mo-Skeet" stuff anymore. Wonderful way to teach youngsters.
     
  19. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    I'm a firm believer in starting off new shooters with shooting success at the start.Whether it's adults or kids! Locking the trap to throw straights and have them stand just behind the traphouse and shoot an imp-cyl or cyl bore with light loads. The giggles and grins tells the story! There's plenty of time to put them into our competition regiment at 16 yards when they've progressed more. If you use a gun and loads that hurt the kid or an adult, you've lost the game and the potential shooters.

    Hap
     
  20. TD1958

    TD1958 Member

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    Hi,I started my grandson on a 12 ga. with 3/4 ounce loads with very light powder charges and he handled it very well and I must say the 12 ga. with the correct light load recoils less than alot of the 20ga. loads simply becaus of the weight of the gun. That is not to say it will work for your daughter.Trial and error, thats the key. i do agree, stay away from 410 it is fir expert shooter. Tim Dearth
     
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