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.410 Again

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by spitter, Aug 27, 2007.

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  1. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Work continues on reloading .410 with steel. This past week, worked on ironing out the reloading process to get more uniform loads.

    Using a MEC Grabber, we resized, primed, dropped powder and inserted wads. I made a reloading block out of scrap Oak (had to look nice) to hold the hulls while I hand loaded shot using a larger Lee powder dipper (out of an older 20 gauge Lee Loader) with a funnel. While sounding tedious - using Mr. Ford's approach - it actually went quite quickly and we then ran the loaded shells through the MEC's crimping stations.

    We experienced no squibbs or perceived lighter loads (hey, they're all light!), the group of us who test-fired this batch felt they were pretty consistent - although our scores left a bit to be desired, the breaks were there - some surprisingly strong.

    POI, patterning, and pressure testing are up next for these 1/3oz clayslayers!

    Jay Spitz
     
  2. redhawk44

    redhawk44 Member

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    Interesting.

    I don't think however, that the 410 is viable as a skeet gun with steel. The reason is that steel requires a larger shot size to perform similarly to lead, and the pellet count needs to stay in the 280-290 area to produce a dense enough pattern, at least in a skeet/IC choke. You run out of room in the 410 hull.

    It is possible to produce loads in the 28 ga. hull that are only marginally less effective that the 1/2 oz lead loads in the 410, but steel takes the 410 pretty much out of the equasion except as a novelty loading.

    This is just MY opinion of course. Don't look for it to be carved on the side of Mt. Rushmore because it ain't there......;)
     
  3. redhawk44

    redhawk44 Member

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    When I posted above, I was thinking about the 2-1/2" 410 hull.

    Sorry about that.

    It appears that 290 #7 steel pellets would weigh right around 11/16 oz and should fit all right into a 3" 410 hull, which would make it viable as a skeet load.

    Steel just may be what we all have to resort to and if the manufacturers start producing it is increasingly larger quantities, it just may become competitive with lead economically----especially with lead approaching $40 a bag.
     
  4. scott calhoun

    scott calhoun Well-Known Member

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    redhawk44 -

    Just to clarify, this is for use as a trap load.

    Scott
     
  5. scott calhoun

    scott calhoun Well-Known Member

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    Should have also added that steel is currently cheaper than lead, as long as you are willing to buy in bulk amounts and take on the bagging chores yourself.
     
  6. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Redhawk:

    The whole reason for developing a .410 load was to shoot the gun. It may not prove to be a practical load considering some of the very issues you mentioned, but I'd rather shoot it than not shoot it even if for novelty purposes!

    But, boy wouldn't that be something if you could start smacking 20+ scores using 140 pellets on a regular basis?! (lol)

    Jay Spitz
     
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