1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

357 bullet in a 9 mm safe to shoot?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Har3rdus, Apr 18, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Har3rdus

    Har3rdus Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Messages:
    111
    I have a bullet mold that produces a round nose bullet in the 120 grain range, but the bullet measures 357. I can use the bullet in my 38 special, but I would like to use the bullet in my 9 mm S&W 639 pistol. The question is, "Do I have to size the bullet down to 356 in order to be safe.?" Does that .001 make that much of a difference? What do you think and what have you done in this area?

    True Blue and Diamond Hard,
    Harry in PA.
     
  2. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,988
    There has to be enuf' room for the case mouth to expand on firing to release the bullet. If the loaded round chambers easily I'd say it should be safe.
     
  3. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,353
    Probably not

    Regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  4. 338reddog

    338reddog Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Messages:
    242
    You should be able to. Lyman's cast bullet book third edition recommends sizing to .358 for 9mm luger. and list loads for a 121 grain bullet. Cast bullets should be larger in diameter than jacketed. I would load a dummy make sure it fits the magazine and chamber and allows room for a taper crimp. Don't shoot cast bullets in a Glock unless you have a after market barrel.

    Jeff
     
  5. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,857
    Location:
    Northeastern MD @ the top o the Bay
    Cast is no problem ...jacketed..no!!
     
  6. kiv-c

    kiv-c Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    852
    For a definitive answer from probably the largest collection of experts anywhere, go to http://castboolits.gunloads.com/.

    A quick search will provide the answer you are looking for!

    Kiv
     
  7. MDMike

    MDMike Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2011
    Messages:
    1,239
    I have an old Hornady manual that lists a 125 gr JHP in a 9 MM. I've loaded and shot them. But with the profusion of 9MM bullets there is today, I would see no need to do it.
     
  8. brownk80

    brownk80 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2007
    Messages:
    640
    WHY???????????
     
  9. Chichay

    Chichay TS Supporters TS Supporters

    Joined:
    May 27, 2007
    Messages:
    1,858
    Do not forget the 9mm is a SMALL, relatively HIGH-INTENSITY cartridge that headspaces in the mouth. Pressures can go up quickly due to small cartridge volume and need to use fast burning powders. By swaging a .357 bullet to a smaller diameter, you are making it longer. If you adhere to the same OAL cartridge length, you're reducing the already small cartridge volume even smaller. I wouldn't do it if I were you, even if you slug the .357 to .355 diameter, and use 124gr data. So where will you get reloading data for your 120gr .357 swaged to .355 bullet? At best, you'd be guessing and hoping; two things you do not want to do in reloading. Simply not worth the risk to your person and damage to your pistol. Chichay
     
  10. scooterbum

    scooterbum Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Messages:
    1,193
    You would need intimate knowledge of the groove diameter, chamber diameter, loaded round diameter, and leade. And be aware that you might be inviting higher chamber pressures. In some pistols, a larger diameter is warranted for greater accuracy. But, you must know all aspects of what you are dealing with.
     
  11. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    6,258
    Yes you can and it will work okay other than you will probably have increased leading and possibly feeding problems because the loaded round will be slightly larger diameter at the mouth than it should be.

    I use to do something very similar with the .38 super only using 160 grain bullets in an attempt to make major power loads.

    But since you are casting the bullets you should have a size/luber anyway so why not get the smaller sizing die.
     
  12. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,988
    You might need to use an oversize expanding plug.

    Cast lead bullets are much softer than jacketed bullets and running a few thousands over groove diameter doesn't in itself raise pressure significantly like it would if you were shooting jacketed. FWIW my pet cast .30-30 bullet is an old Lyman #31141 that drops 'em at .3125" (yes that's at least .004" over nominal groove diameter). Running 'em thru' a (313) sizing die just kisses the sides enuf' to seal so the lube stays in the grease grooves. Sweet accurate load with enuf' IMR4198 to drive 'em up to just over 2000 fps from a 24" barrel, not even a hint of leading.

    As long as the loaded rounds drop into the chamber easily you should be OK, might even notice improved accuracy as the larger diameter bullet will be held in better alignment with the bore?
     
  13. oz

    oz Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,817
    I've done it with a 158 lead bullet. worked fine in a s&w mdl 59. Try it
     
  14. skeezix

    skeezix Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Messages:
    578
    You should slug your barrel. Use dead soft lead, lube the bbl real well and drive the slug of lead down the bbl. I have some .451 round ball that I roll between a couple hard surfaces until its just a bit oversize. A dowel with a .25 acp case on the end works as a ram rod.

    Get out your trusty micrometer (not a caliper - use a micrometer that reads to 0.0001" ) and measure the slug. You want your cast bullets to be about 0.001 or evan a little larger than that. My Sig 226 9mm mics at .356 - so I'll start with .357 cast bullets.

    When your cast bullets are a tad undersize is when you get leading. My .45 ACP leaded at bullets sized to .4515. I opened the sizer die to .4520 and the leading seems to have disappeared.

    Same with my .357 mag - .357 sized bullets lead like crazy - I've gone to .358 - but have not had the chance to check them yet.

    If its a Glock - don't unless you go read the thread on castboolits about shooting lead through glocks.
     
  15. omgb

    omgb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,759
    Location:
    Santa Clarita, CA
    I'm one of those guys from cast bullets web site. Here's the skinny. Most cast bullets are ideal at .002 over bore. So, a .457 bore would take a .459 bullet. The issue with the 9 mm is two-fold. First, it has to properly fit the chamber and head-space on the case mouth. If a dummy round will do that, great.

    Second, and this is a BIG deal, the bullet cannot enter the case too deeply. Do nt seat the bullet too deeply into the case or pressure will skyrocket. How deep is too deep? Anything more than what a factory load utilizes.

    Finally, my Lyman #45 edition says that cast bullets .354 to .356 are safe to use provided you do not exceed the OAL of 1.169 assuming the case has been trimmed to no less than .751. If you are using light loads and if the case chambers with a .357 bullet, I think you are OK. It couldn't hurt though to size a few to .356 and try them first. That's my $.02
    R Talley
     
  16. Doubles Xpert

    Doubles Xpert Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    Messages:
    156
    Had a buddy back in the 80s that had bought a Ruger Blackhawk it came from the factory with a .357 Cylinder and a 9MM cylinder To shoot either one he had only to change out the Cylinder... not the barrel...
     
  17. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    902
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    I started to type this the other day but lost power

    Like what Mr Talley says, it depends on the gun barrel, the dies and the case.

    Normal 9mm dies give a tight ID to the resized case; this can swage a lead bullet down from a larger size. Any damage to the base in the process and you lose accuracy.

    Beretta 92 are a 357 groove with a 1:10 twist. I can stabilize a 180 gr slug and shure overspins (and damages?) thin 124 jacketed again leading to poor accuracy. The previous owner was shooting standard (undersized) lead in this gun and there was so much leading there were no visible grooves.

    Even after cleaning it out, it was inaccurate. I went to 150 and 158 RN lead with light unique loads. Unresized cases allow the larger bullet to fit w/o damage and accuracy improved greatly (6" group at 50 yards freehand)

    The shells make the next factor: Federal are straight wall and allow the bullet to fully seat in the case. Others have tapered case walls and the case bulges in seating and or the bullet base is damaged leading to poor shooting again

    Worked well in Browning HP and a 5906 as well. So yes it can work just fine
     
  18. Chichay

    Chichay TS Supporters TS Supporters

    Joined:
    May 27, 2007
    Messages:
    1,858
    Har3rdus,

    If you have access to Lyman Reloading Handbook, 49th Ed, look up the 9mm Luger caliber, pp. 340-342. On page 342, upper right, cast bullet #356242 120 gr., note loading data. Then look up 38 Special data, pp. 352-355. On page 354, lower left, the same bullet #356242 120gr. is listed with appropriate loading data. Hope this information helps and that is the bullet you have the mold for. I stand corrected in my previous post. Enjoy & stay safe.

    Chichay
     
  19. pitt4570

    pitt4570 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2011
    Messages:
    389
    slug you bore then you will know
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page

can i shoot 357 bullets in a 9mm

,

can i shoot 38 bullets in my 9 mil