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3/8" comb offset on a Rem 1100/1187?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by skeet_man, Jan 10, 2012.

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  1. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    Is it possible? I need b/w 3/8" and 1/2" offset at the comb to replicate the setting on my PFS. Its easy on the pfs, b/c there's nothing to get in the way. However, on the 1100, you have to contend w/ the stock tube. What I've found in the past is if you just try and move the comb over that much, you ended up with a ledge where the comb cut is, the side of the stock gets in the way (where your jaw is), and the front of the comb hits my hand.

    I'm thinking about getting a Wenig DIY to play with, but I'm not sure if its even possible to get this much offset out of an 1100 at all.

    Any thoughts? Really don't want to build something w/ a huge rollover either, since I think the side of the stock would still hit my jaw...
     
  2. Robb

    Robb Member

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    3/8

    The recoil spring tube can be tweaked a little for more offset if that would help.
     
  3. Bob_K

    Bob_K Well-Known Member

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    3/8

    I love my Jack West/Bill Davis stock, but I have not pushed the limits on comb offset. Mt problem is comb height.
     
  4. Mr. Flinch

    Mr. Flinch Member

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    3/8

    I had the same problem with my Winchester Select (Except for the spring tube of course) and I never really got it resolved. I could move the comb all the way right and the ledge would get in the way and hit my face.

    What Robb said is a good idea IMO. Just risky so be very careful.

    Just asking, why are you against more rollover? It's not very noticable and 1100 stocks are cheap by comparison if you want to start over.
     
  5. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    3/8

    Before adjustable combs we just bent stock tubes wether 1100, 870 model 12. Not telling you to do it but that is a method. Also on guns such as 870's and 1100's, one can shim the side with cardboard and actually take wood off the direction you want to go.
     
  6. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    3/8

    What phesantmaster says is true. The laminated cardboard that a shellbox is made of works perfect. Make sure to space out as well as shim out to keep the edge of the stock off the receiver so it won't splinter. You can use the factory stock spacer as a template.

    The Wenig stocks are made proud enough to fit at an angle to increase the cast-off. On a 1100 you'll have to tweak the spring tube slightly so as not put the stock in a bind.

    ss
     
  7. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    3/8

    I thought about bending the tube. I wonder how much can be safely achieved? Only issue is that bending the tube would give you a little offset, but more cast, meaning that the butt would be moved more than the front of the comb (b/c its an angular move rather than a lateral one). My pfs is setup with no cast, just offset @ the comb and pad.

    The reason I'm against rollover is b/c i think the stock would still get in the way of my jaw.

    Theoretically the best idea would be to shave out the side of the stock, then move the comb over so the side of the stock and the side of the comb are parallel, but I don't know if there's 3/8" thickness to the stock before you get into the recoil tube.
     
  8. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    3/8

    I have bent dozens of 1100 spring tubes without a problem, but you're right,
    It moves the butt much farther out the the comb. You could install an
    adjustable pad to bring it back to center.

    I think the best solution is an adjustable comb. You could bevel the stock under the comb so it wouldn't be a sharp edge against your cheek.

    I'd send it to Tron. Put a piece of tape over the word "Remington" and write
    "Beretta" He won't know the difference.
     
  9. 682b

    682b Member

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    3/8

    Ian, this is a right handed Wenig New American that was a DIY. I have posted a picture of the stock so you would get a picture of the off set and the amount of wood in the butt. I hope this helps, Jim

    <a href="http://s110.photobucket.com/albums/n114/jted1952/?action=view&current=wenig003.jpg" target="_blank"> wenig003.jpg </a>

    <a href="http://s110.photobucket.com/albums/n114/jted1952/?action=view&current=wenig002.jpg" target="_blank"> wenig002.jpg </a>
     
  10. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    3/8

    Jim- that helps immensely. Do you know what the exact comb offset is? If that was LH i'd buy it from you :)
     
  11. 682b

    682b Member

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    3/8

    I cut and copyed the following.
    "Approximate dimensions for the New American Style are 1-3/8 x 1-3/8 x 2-1/2 x 14-1/4 with a 1/4" offset comb and a 3/8" toe out (no offset at heel). This style also features a palm swell and 3" grip length from back of trigger guard. The New American Style can be made for any shotgun make/model. We have already made New American Style patterns for many guns, and we can make a new pattern (extra charges may apply) if we do not already have one."
    I hope this helps. JIm
     
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