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270/300wsm

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by mission6222, Dec 3, 2012.

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  1. mission6222

    mission6222 Member

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    does one kick harder than the other, with the same weigth load? (150grn). Interested in buying one or the other, just would like the least recoil felt. thanks
     
  2. musky

    musky TS Member

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    I have owned both. I will say that my 300 had a little more weight than my 270 but when you pull the trigger on my 270wsm you know it right now, but it will tell you that at 404 yards it will drop a 6 by 6 elk where he stands. I like the 270wsm caliber better than the 300wsm. Just my opinion. Larry.
     
  3. K.80

    K.80 TS Member

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    The 270wsm is all you will need. I drop deer at over 200yds with no problem using 130 grain bullets.
     
  4. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    A little less recoil and any WSM don't really work in the same sentence. I have an A-bolt in .300 WSM - excellent big game rifle with all the power and range you could use but I don't like to shoot it more than 3 - 5 rounds in an outing. No problem in the field as that is usually only one round and when there is a big bull in the crosshairs you don't feel the recoil.

    If you really want less recoil plus decent performance the tried and proven .270 Winchester may be the better choice.
     
  5. mission6222

    mission6222 Member

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    I have a 270 win. already. What I am looking for is a cal for 500 to 700 yards on mule deer. looking for least recoil, but get the job done. thanks loyd
     
  6. C-Money

    C-Money Member

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    You may want to look at a 6.5 Creedmoor.
     
  7. mission6222

    mission6222 Member

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    who makes that gun. thanks loyd
     
  8. Fred Neal

    Fred Neal Member

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    Hello
    My opinion is the 280 remington cal.140gr bullet
    Last elk 454 yds and dropped it in its tracks. never felt recoil when shooting on live animal just in benchresting while sighting in and it was minimal.
    Happy hunting and good luck.
    Fred
     
  9. 7mag

    7mag Well-Known Member

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    Watch the long range tv shows. John Burns and the others suggest the 7mm rem mag. with the 168 gr Berger bullets. This set up works really well. 723 yd coyote 1083 yd mule deer 998 whitetail doe 700 yd elk. If your going to shoot long distances with the bigger bullets the short mags turn into single shots. The box magazine is not long enough to seat the bullets out to touch the lands. I have several friends who tried the short mags for long range they all have gone back to the 7mm Remington for the long action and the long box magazine. Recoil is not bad either. I have shot
    30-06's that have kicked much harder then my 7mags
     
  10. C-Money

    C-Money Member

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    http://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/6-5-creedmoor-rifle-and-load/

    Take a look at the link above. The 6.5 is gaining popularity very quickly in the long range world.

    My self, I hunt with a 270win. I usually get closer than 300 yards. Elk & deer dont have a chance when nailed by the trusty ole .270win
     
  11. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    The problem with the Long Range TV shows is they mislead people into thinking that the right equipment is all you need to make those insanely long shots. Truth is is takes a lot of skill and a complete knowledge of how the bullet will react to current air conditions in addition to having the good equipment.

    I do know a few guys that can really shoot like this but they will be the first to advise getting closer for shots on game.

    I would also agree with 7mag as to the 7mm remington being a top pick for big game in the lower 48. Lots of performace at tolerable recoil levels. My first accurate big game rifle was a M700 in 7mm mag. I shot every thing from jack rabbits to elk with it and eventually washed out the throat to where I couldn't seat the bullets out far enough to maintain accuracy. One of those projects I keep forgetting about is getting my old pal rebarreled - maybe this winter.
     
  12. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    If you don't handload, I suggest you limit yourself to popular "standard" calibers. While the short magnums are nice and the benchrest crowd claims that shape of case has more accuracy potential than long-action ones, they haven't really caught on with hunters to the point where we don't have to worry about rifles chambered for them being discontinued. At some point after that happens, ammunition production is curtailed and eventually stopped.

    There were a lot of cartridges that were felt to be "ideal" medium game ones that were discontinued in the recent past and are no longer loaded by the ammunition companies. The 7-30 Waters is a good example - every gun enthusiast thought it was perfect but today, it is an orphan. I have a 14" Contender barrel in that caliber and when I see factory loads at a gun show, I buy them so I will have load-ready brass for years to come. We handloaders can make brass by necking .30-30WIN cases down, but for all intents and purposes, non-handloaders are pretty much out of ammo.

    The 7mmSTW was supposed to be THE long-range 7mm cartridge. And it was until Remington released its 7mm Ultra Magnum a few years later. Now STWs are a Custom Shop-only proposition. I have a .300 Remington Short Action Ultra Mag in a stainless Model 700BDL that I bought a four years ago only because it was going to be discontinued in the near future, according to a contact at Remington. And it was but I think it's a super cartridge that isn't hard on the shoulder off a bench and mine is very accurate with 155-grain Berger VLDs.

    The .270 is one of those cartridges that is hard to improve upon. But I've had two in Model 700s and thought both kicked hard for the muzzle velocity they offered with just a 130-grain bullet.

    But by and large, it is hard to get more oomph out the muzzle without feeling that oomph on your shoulder.

    Ed
     
  13. 7mag

    7mag Well-Known Member

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    I agree you must practice practice & do more practiceing. The drop is pretty consistent once you have shot it out to the ranges you wish to shoot. The wind is the major factor the farther you get out there. What it's doing where you are at may not be what it's doing between your target and you. Plus you must actually shoot your rifle and load out to the range your expecting too shoot. You can't just chronograph your load and punch it into a ballistic chart. We have made several of these (Dial up rifles) and not one of them shoots the same data as the ballistic computer shows. The computer is a good starting point but in our experience has never provided us with the correct data from 200yds to 1200yds. If you plan on shooting a animal at x number of yards unless you have proven your capable of such a shot on a inanimate target you have no business taking that shot
     
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