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20ga vs 28ga....?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by dolphin77, Aug 16, 2012.

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  1. dolphin77

    dolphin77 Member

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    Why shoot one gauge vs the other at skeet and clays? I'm just talking casual, fun shooting, but on a regular basis, one or more times a week. In the same weight gun does the 20ga have more recoil? I realize 28ga ammo is much more expensive....Thanks
     
  2. skeeljc

    skeeljc Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    One reason is you can make a soft shooting 3/4 ounce load for the 28 gauge with IMR SR7625 powder. You can make a great 7/8 ounce load for the 20 gauge but you cannot use SR7625 for 3/4 ounce in the 20 gauge.

    The .410 gauge rules for Skeet!

    Jim Skeel<BR>
    P/W Dealer/Distributor
     
  3. dgh

    dgh Well-Known Member

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    You do it because you can, I have never thought of recoil in the 20 or 28,, both fun to shoot. and the .410 is so fun in skeet,, and uses no shot to reload

    DGH
     
  4. StansCustoms

    StansCustoms Well-Known Member

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    ...aint nothin' like a 28 gauge. Best pattern in the world. Easy on the bod...cheap to reload. AND just plain FUN!.

    I haven't shot a 20 gauge since I bought my first 28 gauge...a 625 Browning.

    I don't reload anything but 28 gauge and 410, usually...just because they are sooo cheap to shoot that way.


    ...and I shoot all 4 gauges with the 28 and .410...scores went up too. Skeet is much easier for me with a 28 gauge....than any other gauge.

    Happy trails ..Stan
     
  5. mag410

    mag410 Active Member

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    The 28 is a fun gun to shoot, but as Jim said, a 20 is more practical. 20 gauge 7/8 oz game loads are cheap and are more than sufficient to break skeet and sporting targets. One ounce 20 gauge hunting loads $6-$7, sometimes cheaper on sale, one ounce 28 gauge loads will set you back about $12.

    There is no doubt that a 28 has a higher "neat" factor, but the guns cost more, the shells cost more, and hulls cost more. 20 gauge shells are cheaper and more available. 20 gauge reloading components and reloading machines are more available. If recoil is an issue there are Low-recoil 20 gauge factory loads. There are also 3/4 ounce 20 gauge reloads that replicate the ballistics of the 28.

    Most 28 gauge guns are built on a 20 gauge frame. 28's built on true 28 gauge frames are usually too light for clay target shooting.

    Sounds like I don't care for the 28? Not so, I have several and really enjoy shooting them. Several years my 28 gauge skeet average has been higher than than the 12 & 20. My favorite dove gun is an Remington 870 28 gauge. But if I had to choose one or the other for casual shooting I would take a 20.

    Michael Goines
     
  6. MDMike

    MDMike Well-Known Member

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    28 ga. I had wanted one since 1982. Finally bought my first last year. Why did I wait so long. AAHS hulls last forever, cheap to reload and neet to shoot. The other day I was at a sporting clay range. As I was walking by a group of shooters I heard one of them whisper "and he shoots a 28 ga." Now I don't know what that meant, but I took it as a complement.
     
  7. The Stive

    The Stive Member

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    I shoot and reload both. I enjoy both. I have only been shooting skeet for
    a few years. I have a higher average with the 20 than the 28. I enjoy shooting
    any clay target game. John
     
  8. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    Last year I started shooting the 28ga exclusively at SxS events. I bought a used CZ "Ringneck"(which I had doubts about holding up to a lot of shooting), and recently won a SxS sporty event and came in second on the five stand event in Duluth, MN.(about 70 entries). At a previous event I ended in second because of two targets(about 40 entries). Most all the shooters were 12s, 16s & 20s.

    The CZ is relatively light, but still the recoil is non-existant. The IC and LM chokes appear to hold quite a tight pattern for most of the 25yd and 30yd targets, because when I could center up the pattern, the targets were smokin'.

    By the way, I've put about 2500 rds through the gun so far and I'll be shooting another couple hundred this weekend.

    Doug
     
  9. amboy49

    amboy49 Well-Known Member

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    I have tubed over and unders and at least two true 28 ga guns. They are fun to shoot but the cost of shells is very prohibitive. Clay buster has a new 3/4 oz. wad out that allows you to use 12 ga. hulls and get the 28 ga. load. I don't know how they pattern but they will break skeet targets with regularity. Doesn't have the same mystique of a true 28 ga. But is more economical from a hull standpoint.
     
  10. 338reddog

    338reddog Member

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    My wife just started shooting shotguns,I took her and my Browning 525 20ga, and my browning white lightning 28 ga.After a couple of shots from the 20 she pronounced that hurts (cheek and shoulder).So I handed her the 28, no comlaints, except she didnot hit a target. She was firing as soon as she said pull, LoL. Then I handed her my super black eagle loaded with 7/8 ounce loads,and she started breaking birds. I too can tell a difference between 20 and 28 andif I did not reload my wallet would feel it to. This week she tried my XT and my TM1. She has declared she loves the Perazzi. She even came back from the club house declaring she needed a Gooey pad.
     
  11. MDMike

    MDMike Well-Known Member

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    338Reddog, in your White Lighting are you using aftermarket extended chokes? If so, what brand? Thanks, Mike...
     
  12. StansCustoms

    StansCustoms Well-Known Member

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    The 28 gauge does have more snob appeal...! Untill you get one, then you realize...the guys that have them found out something that they just as soon everyone else didn't find out...something like the best shootin' gun they ever picked up, i.e. the perfect combination.

    The balistics are the best of any shot gun shell (little known fact). They don't kick the snot out of you when using a dedicated small frame gun (like a 20 gauge by comparison )...and they are super cheap to load...eclipsed by only the 410 in that regard....and are easy to carry around all day on the range or in the field

    I hunt and shoot skeet with mine...with a 1200 fps target load of #8 shot I frequently stop Dove dead in their tracks at 50 yards. Actually longer...but no one would believe the truth....and that's where the balistics come in.

    ...and last I have NEVER had anyone shoulder my 625 Field Browing with 28" barrells without exclaming...WOW! Ever!! I have since bought an XS Skeet 28 gauge, but the 625 Field gun is what started the love affair..and probably one of the most overlooked cheaper Brownings. Many spend the other $1000 and get the Sporting 625...thinking it's a lot better..I believe the 625 Field has the most perfect weight and feel of any off the rack gun have ever picked up.

    Am I a snob? "darn tootin"...and anyone that has one knows why. They are "very" special! ...and I had to wait a loong time to afford one!

    Just My 2 cents..Stan
     
  13. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    The 28 is a great gauge that just seems to work better than it should. You really won't get that impression buy looking at the ballistic tables it is more of a subjective thing but most every 28 gauge shooter I know has the same opinion.

    The downside to all this 'magical' performance is getting the 28 gauge ammo. Expect to find limited selections and high prices - handloading is almost a must.

    So you need to balance the fun/unique factor against practicality. The truth of the 20 Vs 28 debate is probably best demonstrated by what you see in the ammo shelves of any gun shop you might go in to - the 20 is by far the favorite.
     
  14. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    The 28ga is by far my favorite gauge. This gauge just kills farther and harder then it should. Bob Brister alluded to such in his book and said it was because the shot string was very. very short. The 40 MPH moving patterns he shot with the 28ga had the pattern only 4 inches wider then a static pattern. So.. It's almost a what you see is what you get psattern. I have killed tens of thousands of Starlings with my 28ga guns. During the lead days I had a load that shot a 100% pattern at 40 with 3/4 of an oz of #3 lead shot. It did about 76 to 78 pellets. At 40 yards a a centered Mallard was stone dead and almost ruined.

    The only gauge I like more is my 10ga. 9(0% of teh time when I leave the house it's with a 28ga or a 10ga and sometimes both!Jeff

    Jeff
     
  15. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    One thing not mentioned in this thread is patterns. I was reading Bob Brister's "Shotgunning - The Art and the Science", and he speaks highly of the pattern the 28ga throws.

    Edit - Oops, had my window open way too long. Didn't see Jeff's reply about patterns.
     
  16. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    The 20 gauge is for people who don't reload!!! For those who do reload (and have both guns) by far prefer the 28 gauge for its far betten patterns (recoil) and the snob appeal as well. You do have to have confidence in your shooting to really enjoy the 28 gauge to the max. While the subgauge shells tend to cost $2 more a box to buy this is only $80 a year difference in hull cost per 10,000 loads or so (1000 hulls-loaded 10X each). To each there own and break em all. Jeff
     
  17. bluedsteel

    bluedsteel Member

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    After being a bit "beat up" by an extended period of 12 gauge trapshooting (recoil is insidious...and affects different people in different ways), I am now shooting "sub-gauges" almost exclusively. I am confident that at some point, I will go back to the 12 gauge...well, pretty confident.

    Of course, since adopting sub-gauge shooting, my trapshooting is on hold. All I shoot with the sub-gauge guns is skeet and sporting clays.

    One does have to be careful about gun weight. A lightweight, fixed-breech 20 gauge will knock your fillings loose. So, I shoot a tubed 12 gauge gun, and really enjoy it. With the Briley's installed, the gun weighs about 8 3/4 pounds, so shooting 7/8 oz. 20 gauge loads is an absolute pleasure...

    I don't reload yet, so cost is an issue with the 28 and 410, but they are as much or even more fun to shoot at clays than the 20 gauge.

    bluedsteel
     
  18. mtneer88

    mtneer88 Member

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    I love the 28 as well! I believe that my skeet scores are better with a 28 because of the lack of recoil and zero flinch. Have you ever shot a round with your 12 and then popped in 28 gauge tubes? I flinch the first few shots until I get used to the 28.

    Shotguns are like women, I have never regretted pulling the trigger, but some are more fun than others!
     
  19. DoubleAuto

    DoubleAuto Well-Known Member

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    Ok, who is slobberknocking geese at 100 yards with a 28 gauge? It must be happening.
     
  20. 338reddog

    338reddog Member

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    Mike I only have the standard Browning chokes in both the 20 and 28. both guns are 26 in barrels. I received the White lighting as a gift from a friend. if I were going to buy another 28 it would be a 525 or 625 28in. like someone said earlier you cant hold one with out saying wow.
     
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