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20 ga. for trap

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by short shucker, Jan 24, 2010.

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  1. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Andy,

    Just download your 12 ga shells to 7/8 oz 1200fps. They shoot softer than a 7/8 oz 20ga and no need to buy a different gun.

    Just my thoughts.

    ss
     
  2. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    With proper loads a 20 can break targets from anywhere on the concrete. You will give up pattern density and thus probable targets from the longer yardages however. But if shooting for fun, there should be no concerns. Have fun and enjoy :)
     
  3. Spanky

    Spanky Active Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    20 ga. 7/8 oz. of #8 1/2 for 16 yd. targets. Alittle more pellet count for ya, no sacrafice in speed. In a no wind situation I would feel good about it especially if the gun is shooting where I wanted it to.

    You could also load a 1 oz. for for a short yardage handicap. I wouldn't consider #8 1/2 for anything over 16. yard but that's just me.

    I would first find a lighter weight 12 ga. gun and reload to find a perfect lightweight or featherweight shell for yourself. The 20 is fun and good luck with it. I enjoy reloading for it and shooting skeet and wobble trap with mine on occasion.
     
  4. 20yard

    20yard TS Member

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    Nov 30, 2008
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    from my recent experience I just went to a beretta 391 gas action semi and feel no recoil at all. I know alot of older guys prefer this for recoil maybe something o consider while still in 12 ga
     
  5. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    When my left arm could not lift a heavy shotgun because of a pinched nerve and nerve damage, I put a monte carlo stock on my 1187 20ga and converted it to a 7/8ths scale trap gun. Instead of shooting a 9.5 lb trap gun, the weight was pared down to a bit over 7 lbs. That made quite a difference. I could at least hold up the 20ga through a complete round without fatigue.

    For the stock, I bought from Remington parts dept a 12ga 1187 monte carlo deer slug gun stock. As is, it only fits the larger 12ga receiver. I simply erduced the size of the tenon on the stock so it would fit the back of the smaller 20ga receiver. It wasn't that difficult to do, and worked great. The only noticable difference is at the top, where the wood is raised a bit above the edge of the receiver. You don't even notice it unless you look closely. It's such a piddling amount that it just wasn't worth the effort to shape it down and refinish the stock, though that could certainly be done.

    There is a difference in handling. The 20ga is much faster to swing, and it is not as smooth. You can "jink" it around easily. It's really a sweet setup for sporting clays, but you have to make yourself slow down a bit for trap. After using it a bit, my scores were exactly the same between the 12ga and the 20ga for singles. Later my doubles scores went up a bit, because the lighter 20ga is faster to get on the second bird. (After most, but not all, my strength came back I switched to a lighter 12ga barrel for doubles.)

    Recoil. There is no shotgun setup that will shoot with as little recoil as a 20ga 1100 or 1187 with factory 2.5 dram 7/8 oz loads AND STILL CYCLE THE GUN. Period. 12ga guns require at least another quarter dram and often another 1/8th ounce to start cycling reliably. This setup is a real pleasure to shoot. BTW, the 1100 20ga has a bit less felt recoil than the 1187 20ga, and the lightest of all is the 1100 20ga Magnum receiver with a 2-3/4" non-magnum barrel. This is because of the heavier action sleeve on the magnum. The 1187 20ga has an even lighter action sleeve than the 2-3/4" 1100 20ga.

    Barrel length. Keep in mind that an auto receiver is roughly 4" longer than a break action receiver, so add that to get the effective barrel length. A 28" barrel will be the equivalent of at least a 30" break action barrel, and more typically a 32".

    I've posted about this setup numerous times. I should get a pic of it and post it.
     
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