1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

1st Muzzleloader

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by capvan, Jul 16, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. capvan

    capvan Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Messages:
    1,033
    Looking for some ideas for my first muzzleloader. I've been shooting trap and metallics for about 20 years and want to try something new. Not a smoothbore, but that may come in time. Do a lot of New England deer hunting.

    capvan
     
  2. hoffman06

    hoffman06 Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2009
    Messages:
    486
    Location:
    Marcola Oregon
    Capvan, check out any muzzleloader Thompson Center makes. They have a full line of sidelocks or inlines and are very high quality.
    Carey
     
  3. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,521
    Location:
    Idaho
    I have a Browning Mountain rifle that I love dearly but they are hard to find
     
  4. 90Tshooter

    90Tshooter Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2009
    Messages:
    329
    capvan-I second the Thompson Center vote. I have a T/C Hawken and a T/C Omega. Both are great guns. If it's your first I would recommend the Omega for ease of use.

    Joe
     
  5. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,437
    Location:
    Shawnee, Kansas, USA
    Kind of depends on your view of the sport of muzzleloading.

    Are you someone who wants to get "into" the spirit of it, dress up as a mountain man in leathers, and have all the mountain man regalia, and shoot a 54 caliber Hawken flintlock replica?

    Or do you want your muzleloader to perform just about as perfectly as your bolt action, and you just want to take advantage of the muzzleloader season?

    Or somewhere in between.

    My opinion only. Muzzleloader seasons were established to allow hunters with "primitive" firearms to get out into the field and have a little fun. I think it ought to be limited to sidelocks and iron sights. But that's just my opinion.

    Technological improvements in muzzleloading rifles has made some of them virtually indistinguishable from a modern high power metallic cartridge rifle.

    To each their own.
     
  6. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,500
    Location:
    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    I have a stainless steel T/C Omega with a laminated thumbhole stock. With a Leupold UltimateSlam 3-9x muzzleloader scope on it and loaded with Hornady 250-grain saboted SST/ML bullets over three pellets of Triple 7, it puts three shots into 1.5" at 100 yards at right at 2,200 fps. As Tim said, very centerfire rifle-like performance.

    I would never have the patience to fiddle with a flintlock's ignition temperment and cleaning requirements. If you're into the "tradition" of muzzleloaders, they're the ticket. Otherwise, go with an inline. I really enjoy shooting mine.

    Ed
     
  7. goatskin

    goatskin TS Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,781
    capvan ... I hunt with muzzleloaders, both fur and feather, and the first question I like to ask anybody wanting to get into front-stuffing is "How 'authentic' do you want your gun & equipment to be?"

    On the one end: Primer-ignition, sabots & jacketed bullets, pellet-powders and variable-power scopes are nothing but modern rifles without the brass case, and it is no mean feat to drop a deer at 80-100 yds.

    On the other, 'truer' end: flintlock and patched round-ball are both a lot of fun and a lot of frustration, but once you have learned what you're doing, it is no mean feat to drop a deer at 80-100yds.

    There are some 'betweens', too - like caplocks - and one thing to consider is that with a smoothbore, you CAN shoot birds and clays (in addition to fur), but you don't have that option with a rifle-gun.

    Bob
     
  8. goatskin

    goatskin TS Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,781
    My 'Snipe' gun is as absolutely reliable, lethal and user-friendly as it was when it was built in 1753.

    And, no, I don't dress up like a mountain man, etc, but that little, light bag is all I need to carry.

    The last time I took it out, I got a turkey (shot), a hog (ball) and shot a few clays with my gran'daughter.

    Life is good.



    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]
     
  9. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    6,346
    I'm in the traditional muzzle loader crowd. These are side lock guns that use percussion caps and patched round balls with slow twist rifling. The round balls have poor ballistics so you need at least a .50 caliber gun to get a reasonable amount of energy on target. Max hunting range for these guns is about 125 yards. The traditional guns also require a lot of attention to detail with regards to how you clean them and how often as well as how you load them. Check out the T/C Hawken of Lyman Plains rifle for examples.

    The modern muzzle loaders have in-line ignition which is much more forgiving than the side lock design and usually use 209 primers. This part of the gun is the same as a cartidge gun except there is no case. The modern guns also have faster rifling twists that stabilize longer bullet shaped projectiles such as the various sabots and conicals. These guns are effetive out to 250 yards or so. Not nearly as challenging as the traditional gun. Look at the Knight rifle line for examples.

    So do you want the challenge of a traditional muzzle loader or do you just want to pretend that you have a challenge?
     
  10. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,437
    Location:
    Shawnee, Kansas, USA
    Oh, and if you're not interested in the "true" black powder, Hodgdon's 777 powder works as advertized. Takes a lot of the "chore" out of cleaning your gun.
     
  11. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Messages:
    1,085
    Location:
    Central Illinois
    I kind of think that if you want to use a muzzle loader you want to take advantage of the "primitive weapons" seasons. If so, a traditional sidelock muzzle loader is the way to go. I use a flintlock I made in 1976, a TC Renegade I made up from parts, or a TC Cherokee (for squirrel and varmints).

    It is only my opinion but the Savage, using smokeless powder, has no place in a primitive weapons season. Take your shots guys but what does "primitive" mean.

    This year, my sons and I will be using real black powder and real lead bullets, cast from real iron moulds. Nothing elitist, just want to have fun doing it the old way.

    Whatever you choose...you gotta clean it.
     
  12. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,500
    Location:
    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    If you click on the URL above, it will take you to a four year-old ranking of the manufacturers of popular in-line muzzleloading rifles. That whole site contains a lot of good basic information for beginning muzzleloading rifle owners - traditional and in-line - and I learned a lot from it after buying mine. The two primary writers on that site are Chuck Hawkes and Randy Wakeman; Hawkes comes off in his writing as something of a know-it-all, but Wakeman's contributions are pretty good.

    Ed
     
  13. Beni

    Beni Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2009
    Messages:
    453
    Find a club or a buddy to get hands on info from,so you can look at and shoot as many different gun as possible. I have several different makes and models now but thats how I got started. As far as hunting in NY, I use my savage 10ml easiest loading inline going. In hunting PA I use my savage 10ml early doe season,and my TC flintlock on the late season. I would also recomend an TC omega for the first inline or any TC product for a traditional muzzloader. Joel
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.