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1990 Citori clear gloss finish...need to duplicate

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by StansCustoms, Jun 12, 2012.

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  1. StansCustoms

    StansCustoms Well-Known Member

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    For those that do their own stock work...

    I need to sand down a 1990 Browning Monte Carlo comb some..about 1/4 inch, as it's too tall for me.

    I have well equipped automotive paint shop...and can likely make it look like a new finish when done... if I know what the clear coat is.

    Can anyone enlighten me?

    ...also, I need to know a source for the stain used on those guns and grain filler, if possible.

    Thanks..Stan
     
  2. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    Why not strip off all of the finish and completely redo the stock and forend? I doubt you're ever going to get it just right trying to match even if you knew the finish they used. You're still trying to match a finish with who knows how many years of UV sunlight, wear, dents and dings, ect.
     
  3. MDMike

    MDMike Well-Known Member

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    I think Skeet Man has given you some excellent advice when dealing with a Browning or any other stock.
     
  4. StansCustoms

    StansCustoms Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys...

    Sorry if I gave the impression that I was going to spot finish the wood....even though many clear coats are easy to spot finish.

    That's not my plan...on something that small I agree that it would be a good time to just refinish the whole thing while I'm fitting the comb.

    My question was what is the clearcoat that Browning uses? and ...what is the stain they used on those guns and what do they use for grain filler, if known?

    I'd like to know what Browning uses specifically...I may not use what they use ...but would like to consider it....I really like everything about the appearance of the older Browning guns.

    ...even though the Satin Finish on guns of today is much easier to take care of.

    Thanks again..Stan
     
  5. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    Just go with your automotive clearcoat. The polys most companies use has no where near the durability of an auto finish. If you scratch or chip the poly, it'll turn white or yellow, and as mentioned above, they probably do not contain any UV protection to prevent the finish from losing its luster. With the clearcoat, you can more easily repair the dings and scratches, even wet sand them down and re-apply.
     
  6. high 2

    high 2 Member

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    I don't think Browning ever settled on just one finish. If it's a typical Browning high gloss your
    Urethane will look better than the plastic Browning clear. I've been told it is an epoxy of some type. The stain usually is a heavy coat that is on the wood, not in the wood. I've never been able to duplicate. Beware, you may have two completely different pieces of wood and have a hell of a time matching them. Larry
     
  7. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    I'd also guess Browning is buying their finish by the 55 gallon drum (probably the only way to buy it), and they have some crazy good ventilation and respiration systems. Industrial stuff is usually WAY harsher than what can be bought commercially.
     
  8. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

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    I have had VERY GOOD RESULTS using MINWAX HELMSMAN SPAR URETHANE. Comes in a speay can. Buy at WalMart or Home Depot for about $8/can. One can should be enough for 2-3 stocks. UV protection, gloss or satin.

    Do a search under my sign on name, luvtrapguns, dated Oct 12, 2011 to see finised results and procedure used. Post is titled "Done with a spray can".

    I HAVE BROUGHT MY ORIGINAL POST TO THE TOP. IT SHOULD BE FOUND NEAR THIS POST

    Good luck, Marc
     
  9. StansCustoms

    StansCustoms Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the tip Marc..

    I have posted to that thread (Quote: "Done with a spray can") since it deals with the process I was inquirig about in some depth ....without rehashing the same info in this thread..

    I should have done a search...but I have mixed results when I do try a search on this forum. So much so I seldom use the function any more. Sorry for my laziness....

    Best regards..Stan
     
  10. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    Browning uses some type of poly/ epoxy finish. It would be a two part mix of some type. It is very hard to strip. Spray can finishes are not hard to strip at all.
     
  11. ljutic73

    ljutic73 Well-Known Member

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    First I seal the bare wood and fill the pores with a finish like True-Oil. multiple coats using increasingly finer wet and dry sand paper until you're up to about 1500 grit. Let dry completely, then sand gently with 400 or finer aluminum oxide dry sand paper to knock any shine off. Then I use a high quality urethane gloss in a spray can. I load on multiple coats and use a hand held hair dryer to set the surface to avoid runs. After about a dozen or more coats I leave it for a month, then "color sand" it to knock down the shine and level the surface and then polish with a high quality auto polishing compound. Always good results. The trick is to let it harden long enough. A bit time consuming but worth it in the end. That is what is on my custom Sako in the picture.

    I know the Harry Lawson Company in Tucson used an industrial epoxy finish by Fuller O'Brien called Fullerplast on their custom stocks. It is gorgeous and tough as nails but not available to the general public. I know because I tried to buy some.

    Ron Burr


    ljutic73_2008_030346.jpg
     
  12. alec

    alec TS Member

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    I believe the product you are looking for is called Fuller plast. Its a 2 part epoxy type finish. I dont know where you are located but you can't buy it in Ca. Very toxic you will know that when you pop the lid.

    Al
     
  13. high 2

    high 2 Member

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    I've got 5 gallons of Fullerplast here in the shop. It's not an epoxy. It's a catalyzed clear varnish. It's a very tough finish, but as with every type of varnish I've used, it will yellow over time. Open a fresh gallon of clear and it has a yellow tint to it. The automotive urethane I use is about $250 a gallon more than the Fullerplast, and it's that much better. And I can promise Browning doesn't use Fullerplast. Larry
     
  14. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    high 2, Are you able to make spot repairs on automotive clearcoat?
     
  15. high 2

    high 2 Member

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    Most times it can be done. Just spray and feather sand then buff it out with the right stuff. Every once in a while the wood will be a couple of shades darker. I've never figured out why, but most times it can. Larry
     
  16. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    Larry,I haven't had much luck trying to repair that stuff. It is much quicker to finish a stock with clearcoat though. I once finished a Citori with 6 coats and could have stopped with 4. Done in one day. Normally I use Permalyn, it is very easy to repair but takes many, many coats to suit me. I have tried to find a multi-part,high build industrial finish by ICA, but no luck. It's used in industry for cabinet finishing. Most all gun stock finishes are low build.
     
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