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1980's Browning Rust Prevention Advice Requested

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by JAF1680, Jan 19, 2011.

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  1. JAF1680

    JAF1680 TS Member

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    I have a 1980's Browning Citori Trap with (non-chromed-lined chambers) barrels. I have noticed that even between events at shoots (especially when high humidity) the chambers build up a thin powdery layer of orange/red rust. I use oil coated snap caps as soon as I am through shooting for the day and for storage, and it never sits without being cleaned for more than a couple hours.

    1) Will this (i.e. the rust) eventually lead to more serious damage (even though it is cleaned out quickly)?

    2) Is it possible to 'aftermarket' chrome line the chambers? Does anyone do this aftermarket?

    3) Besides putting the snap caps in between each event, which I would prefer not to do, is there anyway to prevent this rust build-up?

    Thanks,

    Lisa
     
  2. comp 1

    comp 1 Well-Known Member

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    I use the wooly snap caps with some rem oil on them--Brownings are notorious for what u describe--just keep oil on the snap caps and clean when possible--I've seen brownings with the chambers rusted out so much you'd think it would be dangerous to shoot them but they work o.k.
     
  3. WindyOneNW

    WindyOneNW TS Member

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    Lisa-

    Try a couple different things. First try using break free oil for your snap caps if you are not using it already. Second, when you clean the gun to put it away for any length of time, soak a couple of federal paper hulls with break free oil. While they are soaking up the oil, attach a new cleaning brush to a section of cleaning rod and chuck the rod in a cordless drill. Soak the brush with a good solvent like Butch's bore shine or shooters choice. With the barrels laying flat on a firm surface insert the brust in to a chamber and begin rotating with the drill motor careful not to go too fast just a nice smooth rotation that you can keep under control is just fine, move the brush in and out of the chambers until the are shiny and look like they are very fresh and clean. Next, push some patches with solvent thru to the chokes. Pull a clean dry bore snake thru each barrel three times from the chamber end. Take those paper hulls with the break free oil and wipe off any excess oil, insert in each chamber and let sit for several days. This should cure any chamber rust problems. It may stop it for a while, if the rust starts to come back then it is time to do it all over again. Hope this helps.
     
  4. JAF1680

    JAF1680 TS Member

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    Thank you comp1 and WindyOneNW. I do use the fuzzy snap caps with oil (not sure which type). I'll have to check when I get home. I also clean with a BoreSnake. It worked okay in the summer. The fuzzy snap caps definitely helped. This winter has been really wet, and my Browning seems to literally rust an hour or so just sitting in the rack between rounds (even when there is not actually any visible rain/water on it).

    WindyOneNW: I'll pass your advice on to my husband.

    I was really hoping there was something to just line the chambers. Maybe more oil is the best solution.
     
  5. daveship

    daveship Member

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    Location:
    delray beach florida
    hi i ran into this problem with my bt99. it turned out there was rust inside the reciever in the trigger housing and was showing up in the chamber after i shot the gun.check inside the reciever and let us know what you find. good luck.
     
  6. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    I have a '83 Citori that I shoot occasionally. Between uses I use "Fluid Film" (from John Deere) in the chambers. No rust in many years.

    Birchwood-Casey makes some good products for rust prevention: "Barricade" (formerly Sheath) is their gun product.

    Ballistol works, too, because it emulsifies with water.

    Kerosene is a light oil that displaces water. Brownells wants a fortune for "Water Displacing Oil" that's basically deodorized kerosene. A 50%-50% mix of automatic transmission fluid and kerosene makes a good gun oil.

    MK
     
  7. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Location:
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    I have a Superposed which is predisposed to developing "flash" rust in its chambers... but never as quickly as you describe! Are you near a "salty" environment or are you exposed to certain types of air pollution?!

    Anyway... I clean my chambers with Flitz, which lays down a preventative layer which helps delay onset. I also keep all my guns in SackUps silicone impregnated gun socks after shooting in my safe.

    regards,

    Jay
     
  8. JAF1680

    JAF1680 TS Member

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    shipingdave@juno.com - There is no rust in the receiver. The problem appears to be localized to the chambers. I don't even have problems with the choke tubes anymore (when I bought the gun they were stuck in) since I started oiling them very well.

    Unknown1: I'll have to look into some of those. I normally just use the gun oil in the orange bottle from Walmart. Thanks.

    spitter: Unfortunately I am about 300 miles from the ocean so probably no significant extra salt in the air. As for air pollution, there is nothing that close to the range except a pulp mill. I did not have any problems with rust over the summer in AZ, but I suppose that is to be expected. The Pacific NW seems a little harder on metals.

    Are there any powders or primers that exacerbate the problem? Any substance that might be a catalyst for this type of rusting? It does seem incredibly fast, but it isn't a normal hard, rough rust but a brightly colored light powder that you can wipe out with your finger.

    Thanks again,

    Lisa
     
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