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1936 Assembly Line!

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Hauxfan, Apr 19, 2012.

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  1. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Moderator Staff Member

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    Someone sent this link to me and I thought some of you might enjoy seeing it.

    I had no idea they had this kind of automation back in 1936.

    "Simply Amazing"

    It is about 9 minutes long.

    Hope you enjoy it.

    Hauxfan!
  2. RickN

    RickN Active Member

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    Very cool.

    I don't think OSHA would approve of a couple of the set-ups.
  3. yakimaman

    yakimaman Active Member

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    Wow indeed! What an incredible look back.

    rm
  4. likes-to-shoot

    likes-to-shoot Active Member

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    "I had no idea they had this kind of automation back in 1936."

    That all happened after you retired, you old goat!!! lol
  5. GrubbyJack

    GrubbyJack TS Member

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    Wow, that was great… I have always wondered if/when WW 3 erupts; the USA has lost this type of manufacturing… We would be at a real disadvantage (aka UP THE CREEK, without).. Just think, this was in 1936, only few years before WW2.
  6. 221

    221 Active Member

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    In the first 1/3-1/2 of WWII, more American people died in factories, and farms than on the Battlefields.....many more were maimed. They then were left to live out their lives on their own, IE, no VA type benefits for them. No heroes recognition, no parades.
  7. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Moderator Staff Member

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    I know I'm old, likes to shoot, but I'm not that old.

    Actually, this footage was taken 2 years before I was born.

    I was but a mere gleam in my Father's eyes........lol

    Hauxfan!
  8. Catpower

    Catpower Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for posting that Hauxfan, in the 60's my Dad needed some parts for one of his tractors, and couldn't wait for the shipping so he went to Waterloo to the John Deere Tractor Works, to pick them up while we were there he asked if we could take a tour of the plant, they had a neat little tour and showed how everything was built, really cool

    221 you sure seem to have a problem with Veteran benefits, and you claim to be retired military, you are so phony
  9. 221

    221 Active Member

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    cp, nice story, the tour sure, customer pickup at the Waterloo factory, doubtful. But anythings possible, including going to dinner with Bill Hewitt.

    My statement above was just historical fact, nothing more, nothing less.
  10. Catpower

    Catpower Well-Known Member

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    221 it was a flywheel for a 720 diesel, there you go again, looking like an idiot, you can still get a factory tour you phony POS
  11. 221

    221 Active Member

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    cp, NS, been on many of them, "Tours". I even helped cast a 4010-4020 head in the old foundry.....NO, The phony is in your mirror.
  12. 320090T

    320090T Active Member

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    Union shop yet?
  13. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

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    221


    Can you site a reference for your claim about the number of people who died, injured and mained during the period you mentioned?

    It is true more people have been hurt or died in farm accidents, but:

    "In the first 1/3-1/2 of WWII, more American people died in factories, and farms than on the Battlefields"

    seems a little far fetched.

    There were a great many other factors that caused the average age cap of 58 for men and 62 for women during the 1930's, such as lack of water and sewage treatment plants, medicines access to hospitals, starvation, weather, etc. etc.
  14. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Active Member

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    where did this idiot come from?
  15. 221

    221 Active Member

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    RicK Barker, I could read it to you or you can read it yourself and then tell your buddy cc he's an ass.

    <EM>The First Hundred Years of the Bureau of Labor Statistics"</EM>

    cc2ooo, KMA
  16. 221

    221 Active Member

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    I'm not sure if these dates are accurate, but here's another reference to my comment. The dates can not be right. I'd say that's more like the first year or so.

    <EM>"In 1944, the War Production Board reported that industrial accidents killed 37,600 workers and injured 210,000 permanently and 4.5 million temporarily between Dec. 7, 1941 and Jan. 1, 1944. Comparable figures for soldiers were 30,100 killed and 75,000 wounded."</EM>

    The fact remains that factories of that time period were death traps, and for SOME, being a soldier might just have been a better deal. The earlier years of WWII were really lopsided.
  17. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

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    Absolute nonsense!

    Over 16 million US men and women served in the US military during WWII.

    Over 400,000 died or were MIA in action.

    Almost 700,000 were wounded.

    You find these numbers on Wikipedia, where shows the total numbers of those killed in WWII in the area of 50 million.

    And if you don't trust Wikipedia, there are at least half a dozen other sites on the internet that will give you the same figures.

    I looked at your source, you either posted the wrong thing, or you did not read it. Nothing there to support your claim.
  18. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Moderator Staff Member

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    Catpower, I believe that your Dad picked them up at the factory, as I put in a little over 31 years at that factory, just as my Dad did also.

    We used to see those coming through on a tour all of the time.

    A lot of farmers were amazed.

    Some thought that we just bought parts and assembled the tractor. But after seeing the tour, they knew we made ever nut and bolt that went into at one time and that included the engines and transmissions.

    Hauxfan!
  19. Catpower

    Catpower Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Hauxfan, 221 seems to have a problem with anything I write, it doesn't bother me, as I know his ilk and know how to deal with them

    It was really cool to see how they made the tractors we did and still use, I always remember those huge stamp presses with the huge cog wheels way up there and how they shook the concrete when they pressed something
  20. 221

    221 Active Member

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    barker, you again spin things for your own enjoyment, yes there were 16 million that served, 10 million of them were drafted, a lot of them were sent back to work in war production, It depends on who reads the numbers, but approx 275000-290000 total American soldiers died in combat, 115000-150000 died from other causes, the Marines lost around 20,000 total and 5000 of them were from other causes. Navy same thing, 34,000combat 25000 from other causes.

    What you fail to realize is your numbers are for the total war, not the early 1/3, the Americans did not get totally into the war until after 1944, that's when the major looses were, remember most D day soldiers were newbies who had never been in combat.

    Now back to war production, I said factories when I should have said war production effort, that's everything from farming, mining, railroads, steel mills,shipyards, coal gas, airplanes, ammunition, the list is endless.

    The numbers them selves that barker posted vouch for the fact that 16 million, soldiers with 400,000 deaths from all causes, made the military at that time "about" as dangerous as anyone else involved in the war effort. Remember those numbers are from a period of over 5 yrs.

    Never did I say that those numbers I posted, represented the total war,,,,,only that they were from a period that the survey was in effect. Only an IDIOT would construe those numbers to be a total figure. We lose over 6000 industrial workers, a year, even today....that would be close to 30,000 in today's environment.in 5 years... for the same period of time, at that time in history WWII.....industrial deaths were at least 50,000 a year....Just basic comparisons of the numbers would show even a moron, that more lives were expended getting the goods out for the first half of the war.

    The lack of basic knowledge of our history and the arrogance of those that never learned history on this forum is appalling.
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