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1100 vs 391 thoughts

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by LukeG, Jul 12, 2009.

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  1. LukeG

    LukeG Member

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    Finally got to shoot a 391 for a round this weekend back to back with my 1100.

    The 391 had a factory monte carlo and looked bone stock. My 1100 is not stock by any means, but as far as price goes the guns were probably about the same since a used 391 is worth quite a bit more than a used 1100.

    I prefer a heavier gun and the 391 felt a little light for me. There was definitely more felt recoil from the 391, and I'm sure the weight differences of the two guns played a big part in that. The 391 felt well made and very well balanced. The only thing that threw me off on the 391 was that damn "boing" everytime I shot. The 1100 has large springs in it as well, but I don't notice them when I shoot one bit. The 391 had a spring that was very noticeable every shot.

    The 391 is a great gun, but I'm glad I chose to go with an 1100.
     
  2. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    I have owned many Berettas and the excessive recoil is why I always sell them. My Beretta 390 with a 1200 recoil system is a joy to shoot but that is a lot to spend to make it shoot soft. I just do not like recoil and an 1100 just kicks softer, parts are everywhere and the parts are cheap. I can buy an 1100 field gun for 250 bucks and have an extra trigger, bolt. bolt carrier/gas system thingy, extra barrel, extra forks, extra gas system parts. For 200 bucks you get a used trigger with a Beretta. Contrary to what people say they do break parts as I have owned lots of them and if you shoot a Beretta as much as I shoot 1100's, Guess what? They break parts as well! Jeff
     
  3. John391

    John391 TS Member

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    I have owned both and though my favorite is the 391 I could live happily ever after shooting a 1100 or 1187. They both do a great job of soaking up recoil and they are both very easy to work on. Both need to be cleaned very regularly and they both point well.
    I do agree the 391 is over priced.
    Great guns. Keep a few spare parts on hand and learn how to work on them.
    Buy the way I have only had 6 jams in the last 11000 rounds I have put through my 391(factory ammo). John
     
  4. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    John, It does not surprise me that you have gone that long with so few malfunctions. I have had the same luck with Beretta's and Remington 1100's. The key is cleaning them. Jeff
     
  5. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    If recoil is the main concern, and all other considerations are secondary, then the 1100 is the way to go.<br>
    <br>
    If it comes down to minor pluses and minuses for both, then get the one that feels the best, points the best, and (unless the stocks are fully adjustable) fits the best. Both are good guns.<br>
    <br>
    My personal preference is for the 1100 and 1187.<br>
     
  6. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    i can't agree with Jeff on this one. The beauty of the 391 (at least mine) is that I seldom have to clean it. My malfunction frequency is about the same as John's. I recently cleaned it after about 8 flats of Estates, but I didn't have to because it was working perfectly.
    I keep it lightly oiled with Breakfree CLP.
     
  7. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    My Sx-1 will go longer between cleaning the either of them! How about this.. 12,000 rounds without cleaning the gas ports before the gun jammed. 12,000 rounds without cleaning the gas ports. Jeff
     
  8. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    Anthony Matarese Jr., cuurent National Sporting Clays champion, when asked about cleaning the 391 said this:

    "Honestly I do not clean my gun nearly as much as I should. As long as my barrel ports are clean and the action is oiled the gun will rarely hang up. When I hear it getting slow I give it a complete cleaning... I hope this helps...."
     
  9. KF9VH

    KF9VH TS Member

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    I don’t understand how anyone could think 391 kicks hard. Every once in a while I will shoot my friend BT99 to remind me why I shoot a 391.

    Cleaning is not a big deal with a 391 either unless you have obsessive-compulsive disorder.
     
  10. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    I shot nothing but my 11-87's for years. I saw the Berettas I shot with malfuncion at the same rate as my 11-87's. Remingtons might need to be cleaned more but if you keep them clean it is a reliable shotgun. I clean my guns after every outing anyway. Being an older design the Remington is a longer action which smooths out recoil. Nothing shoots softer than a Remington auto. The Remington is a better buy as a shotgun. I now shoot a Mossberg 930 with a walnut stock and forearm. This gun cost me 400 dollars and is more reliable so far than either the Remington or the Beretta. I still can't believe how good this gun is for the price. I only have a few thousand rounds through it so far and don't know what it's life will be but so far I couldn't be happier. American made too. My scores keep going up.
     
  11. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Highflyer, what's the recoil like on the 930?
     
  12. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    It is not as soft shooting as my Remingtons. But looking at the design there is very little movement and it appears to slam back the bolt with the shorter movement. The Remington is an older action and the whole action moves back all the way making for a smooth shooting gun. The Mossberg will cycle all loads from 7/8 ounce to 3 inch magnums with ease. My Remington will cycle 7/8 ounce loads but I have to shoot it wet to do that. Not so with the Mossberg. I can't feel much difference between 7/8 ounce target loads and 1 1/8 ounce 1200fps target loads with the Mossberg in recoil. The design is supposed to bleed off excess gases with the bigger loads and maybe, just maybe, the ported barrels help more with the bigger loads. I added a limbsaver pad to both of them. The 930 does not have the twin action bars that the Remington has. It looks similar to the Browning Silver with the metal tube taking their place. The action is simple and easy to clean and looks very durable to me. It does have an aluminum receiver instead of the steel of the Remington. With the wood stock it is fat in my hand and not slim like the Remington. At first I didn't like the feel of it but now I do. It is very balanced in weight between my hands. I shoot at least 200 rounds through it a week now. My sporting clays scores are better than ever shooting in the 80's now in the last few tournaments. I am leading my skeet league with it. It weighs over 8 pounds making for a smooth swing.
     
  13. BAD 303

    BAD 303 Active Member

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    Any of you care to answer why so many 391's get sold vs so few 1100's? I have NEVER seen an 1100 in a registered sporting competition being shot. They might be reliable as a single shot for trap but not any where near the gun a 391 is. And the first two guns i ever owned back in the early 70's were both 1100's. And both were not reliable at all. They did always fire the first shot though.
     
  14. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    I saw a Remington at the last state shoot I shot in. It is true what you say about Beretta being the auto of choice in registered sporting clays shoots. Where I see more Remingtons is when I am shooting with hunters in fun shoots or in casual skeet leagues. There they far outnumber the Berettas. A registered sporting clays shoot is 100 rounds. I have shot with both my 20 gauge Remington and my 12 gauge Remington in registered shoots with never more than one failure to feed. You are allowed up to three. I have shot with several guys that had more trouble with their Beretta autos than I did with my Remingtons. The Remington is an older design that does require you to clean your gun. I clean mine after every 100 rounds. If I am going to shoot another 100 round tournament on the same day I take off the forearm, put a little breakfree on it and wipe off the powder residue and go on. It takes all of a couple of minutes. I will say that my Mossberg is more reliable being a newer design. But one failure to feed per 100 rounds at the most isn't enough to bother me. What is interesting is in my last 3 tournaments I have seen 3 different expensive Italian double barrels have 3 failures while my cheap Mossberg shot without a hitch. I also scored higher than them but that is beside the point. I do think now more then ever that it is indeed the indian and not the arrow. The only reason shooters use expensive guns is to make them feel better. They don't make them shoot better.
     
  15. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    Bad, do you see many 11-87's? I seem to remember, Remington discontinued the 1100 for the 11-87 years ago for sporting clays. Just recently brought it back. I remember seeing plenty of 11-87's being shot.....
     
  16. BAD 303

    BAD 303 Active Member

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    I have never seen an 1187 being shot in a registered shoot either. They may well be good trap guns but are not a reliable two shot auto. I see 391's all day long being shot 300 rounds a day and more from several top shooters without the first glitch. I have shot almost 3000 registered targets this year and have had not one jam yet including practice and games,that would be another 1000 rounds or so. This is with an old 303 though. And the 391 is a more reliable auto yet. I am not running down the 1100 or 1187 but the numbers used speak for themselves.
     
  17. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    I guess we all live in our own world. I shoot sporting clays tournaments every weekend. You are right. Berettas are the top auto. By far most shooters I see are using over-and-unders. I must be a jinx to Beretta autos. The first guy I shot with in a registered sporting clays tournament had two failure to fires in 100 rounds. In skeet I have only shot against maybe 3 different Beretta autos. One of them had trouble while I was shooting with them. In fairness there are not any autos of any brand that I haven't seen mess up, including the Benellis that so many hold dear to their hearts. Lately I have seen a several over-and-unders mess up. A Perazzi with a broken spring, a Beretta that failed to fire the second trigger, and a Beretta where the trigger guard broke off. All that in the last few weeks. Guns are manmade mechanical devices. That insures that at some point they will fail. I will say one thing for the Remingtons. When they do break they are very cheap and quick to fix. Unlike an expensive gun.
     
  18. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    I have to respectfully disagree with the Beretta folks here. I shoot my 1970's vintage field grade 1100's at registered trap and although they are obviously not the number one trap gun, neither are the Beretta auto's.
    They weigh less mainly because they are alloy construction.
    I shoot my friends 391 well, but he seems to have some cycling problems that I have not experiences with any of my 1100's. I have had parts broken, but when repaired it cycles 7/8 to 1 1/4 ounce loads every time and I even have the Magnum action bar for added weight. I do clean it every two or three registered shoots,and wipe it down every time I shoot. If your 1100 isn't working properly, there is something wrong that can easily and cheaply be fixed. I bought the 1100 magnum at a gun show last year for $325 and it has 3 thin wall choke tubes with it on a cut down barrel. Perfect for my duck blind over decoy's
     
  19. Squeal

    Squeal Member

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    I have shot my 1100 Competition 5000+ rounds this year, singles, doubles, handicap, not one falure. Great gun for the money. I like mine so much, I bought one for my son.
     
  20. 391 shooter

    391 shooter Well-Known Member

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    I like my 391's for a lot of reasons,easy to deep clean and as far as parts, firing pin springs once in a blue moon, never had one fail me but have shot a lot of rounds with a broken spring on the 391's with no problems. I short clean the gun every time I shoot, it take 90 seconds after the gun cools and I put it away. I also shoot a 11-87 turkey and sport clays and an 1100 cause I got it cheap.

    Go shoot Dove and pidgeons in Argentina with a 11-87 or 1100, you will shoot 1/2 as much with an 1100 or 1187. By the way carry 2 391's with you as they get so hot you can not hold onto them, they will keep shooting but the gun heat gets ya.

    Oh yeah, I can by 8 new 391 Teknys Golds or one Perrazzi, I have a Teknys with way more than 50K rounds though it and am very happy with it.
     
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