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1100 vs 1187

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by jd288, Jul 21, 2009.

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  1. jd288

    jd288 TS Member

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    Have a chance to buy a 1187 for $550 in 95% condition. Any opinions on price and comparison of 1187 and 1100. Thanks in Advance
     
  2. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Never owned an 1187. I love my 1100's though. I have several. I bought my last 1100 at a gun show a couple of years ago for $325. It was pretty rough but had not been shot much at all. You can usually buy real nice older 1100's for $400 or less.
     
  3. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    No real difference between 1100 and 11-87. I think you can get them at Walmart or Academy for 600 dollars. The Walmart guns I have seen are camo and the Academy guns are all black. You do have the advantage of being able to shoot 2 3/4 inch or 3 inch with the 11-87.
     
  4. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I have both the 1187 and a couple of 1100s. I like the 1100s better because they seem to be a bit trimmer. That is just a subjective thing on my part. The $550 asking price on the 1187 you are looking at is on the upper end of reasonable unless there is something special about the gun. Not a screaming deal but not a rip off either.
     
  5. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Brian in Oregon is the resident 1100/1187 expert, but I believe the big difference is the 1187 has a pressure compensated gas system (allows you to shoot target loads AND heavy field loads) and has a stainless steel magazine tube and a thicker (wider) extractor.
     
  6. mrskeet410

    mrskeet410 TS Member

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    Target barrel? If not, it may not function reliably with light target loads.
     
  7. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    I have and shoot both an 1100 TB trap straight stock (circa 1980) with a 30" step rib fixed full barrel and an 11/87 Premier trap (circa 1987) with a Monte Carlo stock, 30" choke tube, step rib, over bored barrel.

    Each is a wonderful gun that is very dependable when kept clean. They each have deep rich bluing, excellent wood and 2 3/4" chambers.

    The 1100 TB is the wife's gun that she lets me shoot on occasion.

    That said, the 1100 is pressure compensated and shoots just about anything you feed it. It shoots like a dream with 1 oz loads.

    The 11/87 is not pressure compensated and is limited to target grade ammunition of 3 1/4 - 1 1/4 or less. It loves 1 oz. loads.

    The 1100 TB has a fixed full and the 11/87 has three choke tubes marked full, extra full and super full.

    The 1100 has a blued steel magazine tube and the 11/87 has a stainless steel magazine tube. Brian will tell you that the 11/87 has a larger and more robust extractor. Remington says that the barrels are not inter-changable. There have been discussions in other posts on what modifications are necessary so that they will interchange. I will not go there.

    The forearms, recoil pads and pistol grip caps are different as are the stock finish and checkering. The 1100 has the glossy finish and pressed checkering while the 11/87 has a satin finish and cut checkering.

    Each gun has its own personality. The 1100 seems to swing a little faster as the 11/87 has a heavier barrel. They are both flat shooting and very soft shooting.

    Over the years, I have had many offers on each gun but they are like family to me.

    Some day, the wife has promised to shoot with me again.

    Ed Ward
     
  8. howie

    howie Member

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    Highflyer and School Teacher are both correct. The 11-87 was designed with a more robust gas system to handle heaver loads the 1100 could not handle. But the target versions came with a gas system that would only handle 2 3/4 target loads. If you put a "regular" barrel on a target 11-87 the gun will handle heavy 2 3/4 and 3 inch loads.
     
  9. powderburn

    powderburn Member

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    Hi there,
    The only difference of the two is the 87 has a stainless steel mag. tube for better durabiity, and the chamber length is 3". The 3" in. chamber can be a bear if you use a shell catcher. That empty hull will flip around in the chamber causing you grief in getting the catcher off, picking the empty out, and putting the catcher back on, getting a new shell in, and all this done and not holding up the squad? NO WAY! Either gun will do the job, though. You cant put a trap competition target barrel on an '87 either-chamber won't permit it.
     
  10. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    jd288, you didn't say what particular sub-variants of the 1187 and 1100 you were looking at. Were they field models, trap models, or ???<br>
    <br>
    For field use, GENERALLY you are better off going with an 1187. This is because the 1187 has a pressure compensated gas system that allows these guns to shoot everything from light 2-3/4" loads to heavy 3" magnums, buckshot and slugs. There are also 1187 Super Mags that shoot the 3-1/2" shells, and will shoot almost everything smaller. They get iffy with loads under 3 dram 1-1/4 oz, and trap loads are lighter than that. Some work, and some don't. The 1187 comes in 12ga 3", 12ga 3-1/2" and 20ga 3" (which also shoots very light 2-3/4" loads).<br>
    <br>
    The 1100 is made a bit fancier, but no longer come in 3" magnum models. But they are made in three gauges the 1187 is not, which are the 16ga, the 28ga and the 410. Since some don't feel a need for 3" magnums, they prefer the 1100 guns for field use.<br>
    <br>
    As far as trap guns go, the 1187 trap guns are no longer made, but are still available used, some being in new condition. These have a step barrel with a slightly higher rib, and a factory backbored barrel with special choke tubes. They pattern quite well. I really like mine. The 1100 trap guns have been made for, what, something like 45 years or so? There have been numerous sub-variants, but generally they are very well liked, and some trap shooters prefer the older ones with fixed full chokes. The older ones have better fit, finish, and machined parts. The latest version, the 1100 Classic Trap, is actually a hybrid between the 1187 and 1100. It uses the later 1187 bolt, but has an 1100 gas system. The barrels are not factory backbored, and they lack step ribs. My opinion is you can buy a decent used 1187 or 1100 trap for far less money. All trap barrels lack the pressure compensating gas ports, and are only for light loads. This includes the 1187 trap gun. (If a field barrel is installed on it, the 1187 trap can shoot heavy loads.)<br>
    <br>
    Another opinion of mine is that the 1187 12ga has less recoil than the standard 1100 12ga, but the 1100 magnum has even less, because of its heavier action sleeve. (The 1187 and standard 1100 12ga have the same action sleeve.) For the 20ga guns, the 20ga magnum has the least recoil, the standard 29ga next, and the 1187 20ga is in third place. That's because it uses the lightest action sleeve of all, and provides less dampening.<br>
    <br>
    The main difference in the bolts between the 1100 and 1187 is that the 1187 uses a wider extractor. Late model 1100s now use the 1187 bolt, and sometimes to get early barrels to fit on a late 1100 you have to widen the extractor slot in the barrel a bit on both sides with a file. Anyone with patience and a bit of care can do this.<br>
    <br>
    Another difference between the two guns is that the 1187 uses a stainless steel magazine tube, and the 1100 uses a blued carbon steel magazine tube. The stainless provides for corrosion resistance, which is appreciated by those who shoot outdoors in bad weather, particularly around marshes. The blued carbon steel tube was retained on the 1100, and it reputedly is more reliably in the long rub, because the steel is slightly less brittle. If you are lucky enough to have the time and money to shoot multiples of tens of thousands of rounds, you might see the difference. There is a difference in the magazine tube retention. The 1187 and late model 1100s use a cap with inner teeth that engage a plastic end plug inside the mag tube. All other 1100s use a detent ball on the forend that engages the mag tube cap. The two are not interchangable.<br>
    <br>
    Personally, I prefer the 1187, mainly because I hunt and do tactical shooting with them. For a trap gun, I have both an 1100 and an 1187, and while I prefer the 1187, it really wouldn't make much difference to me which one I used. We're an 1100/1187 family, and have a pile of them.
     
  11. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    Impressive knowledge Remington 1100 and 11-87. The Remington website says the 11-87 is not designed for target loads of less than 1 1/8 ounce at 1200 but I have had no problem with mine shooting 1 ounce loads and even 7/8 ounce loads. I would think an 1100 with a target barrel would be better though. I have to shoot mine wet to shoot super light loads. I prefer to use American made guns. I like the feel of a Remington and haven't ever shot a softer shooting gun. I am using my Mossberg auto more and more though. Another American made gun and very reliable. It does feel like a cheaper gun but I can sure shoot it. Saturday I was shooting against a guy with a Browning Cynergy. He was having a lot of trouble with his second trigger firing. That makes the fourth weekend in a row when I was shooting with shooters with far more expensive over-and-unders where my cheap 400 dollar Mossberg was flawless while they had problems with their guns. Their guns were Berettas, Brownings and a Perazzi. I also outscored each of them which is even sweeter. It really is not the arrow but the indian. I shoot my 20 gauge 11-87 in subgauge competitions. It is the softest shooting gun I own. I think I could put a thousand rounds in a row through it without a mark on my shoulder.
     
  12. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    The Remington website is correct for SOME 1187 field barrels, particularly the camo and matte finish barrels. I've found the light contour field barrels can cycle all but the lightest trap loads. I think Remington is covering their bases in case some barrels don't work with lighter loads.<br>
    <br>
    I have an 1100 barrel that's had the gas ports enlargened. It cycles very light loads, much lighter than any factory 1100 will cycle. Max trap loads cause too much bolt velocity, and the bolt slams hard to the rear. Actually feels more like a pump with those loads.
     
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