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1100 stock to barrel relationship question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Tenshot, Mar 24, 2009.

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  1. Tenshot

    Tenshot TS Member

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    I just picked up my first 1100 and an extra barrel,I am going to have to shorten the stock a bit to fit me.
    The extra barrel I plan on using on it is a 30" fixed choke marked mod trap, the barrel has the 2 beads but is not a step rib.
    The site picture with the field stock is a good match, not to high or to low.
    I want to get a second stock so I don't have to cut the original and I would like to try a strait non comb.
    would the strait stock be a big change to the site picture or poi and if so approx how much, or should I stay with the field stock?
    I would like to find out so I can start looking for the correct stock for this combination.
    I have just had it long enough to give it a good cleaning and have not shot it more than to just check function.

    Thanks in advance
    Lee
     
  2. Tenshot

    Tenshot TS Member

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    Part of what I was trying to find out and forgot to ask, What is the drop spec on the strait non comb stock.


    Lee
     
  3. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,675
    A straight trap stock will be a lot higher than a field stock. If the beads line up with your current stock, you will see space between the beads with a straight trap stock, and more with a monte carlo trap stock. If you are happy with the field stock, get another one of those, which you can probably get a lot cheaper. However, if you are going to shoot trap, you will most likely want your gun to shoot higher as you get more experienced. Also, it may be a little soon to start shortening your stock, because, again, as you get more experienced, your stance and posture will probably change and you will want that longer stock back again.
    Very few people need to shorten a field stock, especially to shoot trap. Best leave things alone for awhile.
     
  4. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    The straight comb trap stock is pretty close to the same height just to the rear of the grip area, but it is parallel to the bore from there back, with no downward slope.<br>
    <br>
    Also, the comb on the straight trap stock and the monte carlo trap stock are at the same exact height. The difference between the two is that the butts are at two different heights. The butt is lower on the monte carlo stock. This gives the optical illusion that the comb is higher on the monte carlo stock, but it's not. In practical terms, the stright comb stock tends to fit better for those with shorter necks, and the monte carlo fits better for those with longer necks. The comb is at the same position on your cheek, but the butt position changes on your shoulder.<br>
    <br>
    Remington sells trap stocks, but they are expensive, running just this side of $200 the last time I checked. However, if you can make do with a plain grain monte carlo stock, Remington has a plain walnut 1187 slug gun stock that has a monte carlon comb for $98. I've bought these, and compared them to trap stocks. They are almost identical, though the length of pull is slightly shorter (probably to make up for cold weather clothes). The checkering is hand cut, but is a simple pattern.<br>
    <br>
    Another option is to post a WTB ad further down on this board. Someone will have a straight or monte carlo stock for sale. The 1100 and 1187 are interchangable, but most 1100 trap stocks are older with pressed checkering, while the 1187 trap stocks are all cut checkering. Late model 1100 trap stocks also have cut checkering. The wood is generally pretty decent on the trap stocks.<br>
    <br>
    In practical terms, a flat rib barrel with a field stock shot 50/50 for me, and some people have even shot 40/60 with them. The monte carlo stock changed that to 60/40 for me. If you are not familiar with this, 50/50 means half the pattern is above the bead, and half below. 60/40 means 60% of the shot pattern is above the bead, and 40% is below. This is probably the minimum needed for trap. A few have said this combo gives them 70/30, so you can see different body builds affects this comb to bead to pattern center relationship.<br>
    <br>
    Even more important is that I no longer needed to 'stack the beads" in a "figure 8" becfore shooting. This is because the gun now fit me and shot where I was looking. Now I just shoulder and shoot it, without checking the beads.
     
  5. Tenshot

    Tenshot TS Member

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    Brian thanks that's what I needed.

    Looks like I need to look for the strait no comb stock,after shooting the gun this morning I need to bring the poi up a bit and with me riding just off my thumb and a short stocky build, the position of the butt and slight rise will put me at a good starting point to fine tune from.


    Thanks again
    Lee
     
  6. LUGNUTZ426

    LUGNUTZ426 TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Messages:
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    TENSHOT
    I HAVE A STRAIGHT TRAP STOCK LAYING AROUND. IT HAS CUT CHECKERING AND IS A HAIR SHORTER THAN NORMAL. THE FINISH ON THE TOP OF THE COMB IS POOR DUE TO
    HAVING A CHEEK EASE ADHESIVE PAD ON IT. I COULD EMAIL YOU A PICTURE AND GIVE YOU EXACT LENGTH MEASUREMENT IF YOU ARE INTERESTED.

    JOE
     
  7. Tenshot

    Tenshot TS Member

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    Joe,


    Sent you a PM


    Thanks
    Lee
     
  8. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    Brillion, WI
    Lee,

    Brian gave you information to explain most things and all of it is correct.

    Regarding the length of stock you need: your head and neck should be upright and the gun should be mounted with the top of the recoil pad about and inch above your collarbone - right on your collarbone.

    There should then be just over an inch and no more than 1.5 inches between your nose and the base of your thumb with the gun mounted. If you cut a stock, be very careful not to shorten it too much.

    The correct stock length is affected by how you stand when you shoot, the stance that you use. Your feet should be placed in a normal standing position about shoulder-width apart. A good starting point would be to stand so that a line drawn across the tips of your toes would be parallel to a line drawn down station 5 if you shoot right-handed and down station 1 if you shoot left-handed.

    If the distance between your nose and thumb is two inches, shorten the stock no more than 1/8". The ratio is 1:4. If there is an extra inch between your nose and thumb, shorten it 1/4" (Remember: your head and neck should be upright, not leaned forward and not 'scrunched' back but rather, upright.)

    If the stock needs to be shortened, it is an ideal time to also correct the pitch of the stock, if necessary. The pitch is correct (for you) if, when you mount the gun, the entire recoil pad or butt, top to bottom, makes simultaneous contact with your shoulder pocket, which is just inside of your shoulder joint.

    When these stock dimensions fit you, ideally, your eye should be looking only slightly down onto the rib with only moderate pressure of your cheek on the comb, whether it be rising field stock, a parallel straight comb or a Monte Carlo comb, parallel or nearly parallel to the bore.

    Rollin
     
  9. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Learned it from your guide, Rollin!
     
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