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1100 REMINGTON BARREL LIFE EXPECTANCY

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Ontario Chris, Apr 1, 2007.

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  1. Ontario Chris

    Ontario Chris Member

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    A friend of mine and I disagree on the life expectancy of a Remington 1100 barrel. I say that it will last 200k shots and he says it will last a lot more than that. Does anyone know how many shots a barrel might take before it is worn out? How about an 1100 receiver?

    Chris
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Barrel, forever and a day. Receiver, a long time. HMB
     
  3. Ontario Chris

    Ontario Chris Member

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    Tron,

    Are you talking about a Beretta barrel?

    Chris
     
  4. rjdden

    rjdden TS Member

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    Ok I know you are asking about an 1100 Barrel. My wifes 1100 had over 12,000 rounds through it. Could not see any problems at all with it. Now I'll tell ya about my 870 Wingmaster 12 gage Modified choke. Shot the bajeasus out of it. When I sold it It had over 38,000 rounds through it. I had a second barrel with no V.R. It was used for hunting only. The V.R. barrel was used for Trap Shooting only. With both barrels the rounds totaled over 42,000. And not once did the gun see the inside of a smithys shope xcept for when I had the front bead changed and a center one added on to the V.R. barrel and a large headed left handed safety put on it. So you see they last forever as long as you clean them properly but not necessarily right away only if the gun was exposed to rain. Then clean it as soon as possible. But due give it a very good cleaning and inspection once in awhile along with the receiver. Give it a very nice mild or an easy coting of oil. This I recomend especially at the end of a season such as hunting or Clay Bird Shooting. Rich. (inPeoria, Az.
     
  5. Ken X

    Ken X TS Member

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    Barrel should go several million. There is nothing to wear out! Maybe wear it out from cleaning it too much?
     
  6. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    depends on storage method..says so on the barrel..very tiny
    ***please don't store in shower/ bathtub- may shorten barrel life**
     
  7. jerry chipman

    jerry chipman Member

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    I've had two of them fracture right through the area where the bolt locks up, one barrel lasted for probably fifty to sixty thousand rounds the other less. One of the barrels had been to simmons and had the Olympic style high rib installed, the other was a Money Maker Big Bore with a high rib. That is why I went to the Beretta auto, more metal in the receiver area. I didn't want to spend the money for a high rib again and then have the barrel break. I still have the Money Maker big bore barrel that is broken if someone wants it. Jerry
     
  8. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Jerry,

    Maybe the gunsmiths screwed the barrels up when they installed the aftermarket ribs. Were the barrels heated up when the new ribs were installed, causing the barrels to become brittle. HMB
     
  9. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    The only parts of a pump or auto shotgun barrel that gets wear is the lockup surface and where the rim rests in the chamber.<br>
    <br>
    Remington made (and I assume still makes) oversize locking lugs for the bolt to bring headspace back into spec. This was something routine at one time for knowledgable gunsmiths.<br>
    <br>
    Also, it is possible for shells to peen or wear the contact point where the rim headspaces on the back of the chamber. This is not as common today as it was at one time. Early Remington pump and auto, including early 1100's, have 45 degree rim seating surfaces. These wear quicker and go out of headspace quicker than the later 55 degree angled chambers. How can you tell which chamber your barrel has? That's what the big star is on the barrel. It's to indicate to a gunsmith to use a 55 degree go/no go gage, instead of a 45 degree go/no go gage. Headspace will be inaccurately measured with the wrong gage.<br>
    <br>
    (Note that hinge guns almost always have flat contact faces in their chambers for the shell rims, and thus use a different set of go/no go gages than most pumps or autos.)
     
  10. jerry chipman

    jerry chipman Member

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    HMB, I always wondered about the heat too. Just leary of making another barrel so I went with the Beretta and bought a barrel from NCP with their adjustable rib. Jerry
     
  11. schutzemgud

    schutzemgud TS Member

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    I have heard of recivers wearing out but never a barrel.

    Mike
     
  12. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    tony olivito from Ohio shot over 1 million registered targets with his 870 and I believe that gun is in the hall of fame in Vandalia. I also think that Remington gave him another gun after that feat. Motordoc
     
  13. Steve-CT

    Steve-CT TS Member

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    Read the old 1100 threads that Gene Batchelor of IL compiled from contributors including myself, who've shot them for decades.

    The barrel life tips are these:

    A. Grease the top exterior surface of the barrel extension.

    B. Keep the forend cap on tight

    C. If you start getting primers backing out on factory loads; it's time to change the locking block to an oversize one marked with an "L" (usually about 100,000 or so rounds)

    Greasing the external top surface of the barrel extension forms a "gel" cushion
    between the top top surface of the barrel extension and the inside surface of the receiver. It is the vibration contact that contributes to the cracking on that side.

    Keeping the forend cap tightly reduces these vibrations and hence, metal to metal contact.

    The locking block should be lightly lubed and the recess of the locking block extension cleaned regularly. Normal wear and tear will cause the locking lug
    recess to enlarge, causing a sloppier fit and hence, a "hammer" "peening" effect on the inside surface of the barrel extension.

    This is why the barrels have been "stress relieved" right along the chamber's edge where the barrel extension meets.

    I am currently shooting a part # "9526" bbl; 30" fixed full trap with target beads and NOT the step rib of the "9612" bbl. My 9526 bbl was made in the mid 1960s and is still going strong with almost no bluing wear on the top side of the barrel extension. (That means there is no metal to metal contact there)

    For my own records: my first 1100 receiver lasted 17 years of continual, shooting, probably to the order of 20,000 rds per year, avg. and at least 250,000 to 300,000 rounds before one day, the magazine tube separated from the receiver itself.

    The 9612 barrel it came with lasted another five years beyond that when it too, finally developed a hairline crack near the front edge of the locking lug recess. The bolt from that original 1981 built 1100, went into another 1100 of mine, where it soldiered on for an additional, two years, before it, too developed a hairline crack near the extractor cut out.

    Also bear in mind the receiver rails will wear thin, too. It is important to lube them frequently or even lightly grease them using a Q-tip NEVER your fingers! When the rails wear too thin, you will notice links breaking more frequently. This is because there will be too much "slop" allowed to the link in its travel and can get stressed more quickly on that back leg that always breaks on this part.
     
    Brent Paulus thanked this.
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