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1100 Longevity Tips

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Steve-CT, Jul 21, 2007.

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  1. Steve-CT

    Steve-CT TS Member

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    Gene B. posted these in a link from old posts here, years ago from myself and others. I thought it would be a good idea to post these ideas again since there is no "sticky" post. Please copy and distribute to anyone who shoots an 1100 or an 11-87. The tips below do help.


    The trick to 1100 longevity is as follows:

    1. Change the action spring in the stock every 10,000 rds
    (some say 5,000, but I've been getting 20-25 yrs of service life
    going every 10,000) This is far more important than changing the buffer disc at the back of the bolt and prevents bolt to receiver impact (from the spring tension offering resistance
    against the bolt's reward travel) A new action spring is 15" long from the factory before it is installed and compressed. 14-1/2" means - it's time to replace.

    2. GREASE the top, exterior surface of the barrel extension
    doing this, forms a cheap, "gel" cushion that soaks up the metal to metal impact of the top of the barrel extension against
    the inner surface of the receiver top caused by vibrations during firing.


    3. Grease the bottom flat surface of the outside of the barrel that presses against the foream support (spring steel bushing)
    doing so will DOUBLE the service life of that fragile part.

    4. Grease the surfaces of the receiver where the forend support bites into - again reduces some wear and soaks up vibrations

    5. After about 100,000 rounds - switch to a locking lug marked with an etched "L" (for large, or long). This takes up the space worn by the friction of the standard lug against the barrel extension over time. Once that recess becomes sufficiently worn, you will get more "peen" impact of the locking lug as its fit becomes loosened and is allowed to whack the barrel extension harder due to the increased space it has to move in.
    Once you do this, you're good for about another 100,000 rds
    after that, you may need a new barrel. Tell tale signs of worn locking lug recesses include: primers backing out of factory shells. I've worn at least two barrels this way and have replaced a few for other people as well over the years.

    6. Inspect the gas cylinder for "ridge burrs" Ridge burrs form from the ring friction from the action bar sleeve driving everything home, hard. Smoothing them out, carefully prevents "train wrecking" of the action bar/action bar sleeve/bolt assembly - all that inertia driven by the action spring slamming the piston and piston seal, home into the "collar" or more properly, GAS CYLINDER - driving the rings into the cylinder - hard - and then having the rings get "tripped up" on ridge burrs that formed inside the gas cylinder. Smoothing out those burrs - will DOUBLE the service life of the piston and piston seal.

    7.DO NOT make a habit of using STEEL WOOL or metal abrasives on the magazine tube to clean it. Doing so, WILL over time, reduce the OD (outside diameter) of the mag tube enough to cause, loose ring fit and hence, GAS LOSS leading to irreparable functioning problems. Instead, use rags and solvents, wipe dry and put a drop or two of BREAK FREE on the tube. If you have enough caked on crud to scrape off, use a PLASTIC edged tool, like a disposable plastic picnic knife or other similar NON METAL MARRING plastic tool (expired cut up credit card or something) to scrape carbon residue from the tube.


    8. ALWAYS put ONE drop of BREAK FREE or similar lube on the center of the firing pin spring where it is stressed the most.

    9. Using a Q-TIP - NOT your fingers - GREASE the underside, flat surfaces of the receiver rails that contact the front part of the link (the "wing" part of the link) Doing this will reduce friction wear and lengthen service life of both the link, and the receiver. Also, new links should be polished, deburred and lubed to prevent burr "snags" during cycling-which leads to broken links and greasing the rails reduces friction wear and the thinning out of the rails which, over time, allows for more MOVEMENT of the link during the firing cycle, which leads to premature link breakage


    10. Lube the white spots on the action bar and grease the "fracture point" on the right leg of the action bar.

    Replace the link if not broken - after 5,000 shots before entering a serious tournament; replace the firing pin retractor spring at 5,000; the extractor at 10,000, the action spring at 10,000, the piston rings at 5,000 and the forend supports and
    rubber vitron barrel seal at 3,000 rds to enhance reliability.

    Also, when removing the recoil pad, stock or action spring - DO NOT bear down with your weight against the butt, and the mag tube end against the floor - that will stress the mag tube and lead to prematurely separating the mag tube from the receiver, causing it to be junked.

    Following these proven steps along with regular cleaning, and your 1100 is highly unlikely to break down on the line. Mine has not broken down at a trap shoot in over ten years.
     
  2. DocJim

    DocJim Member

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    Indiana, PA
  3. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    I had a skeet model B I bought used in 1977 and used it for everything including trap shooting until 2005. I broke the forearm support and operating bolt retainer at the state shoot, but it never quit working. First breakdown or parts bought ever.
     
  4. Steve-CT

    Steve-CT TS Member

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  5. Steve-CT

    Steve-CT TS Member

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    Also, remember when ordering extracors for the older 1100s (DuPont era from the 1960s-1980s) - - use the "870" extractor.

    If you order an "1100" extractor from Remington, they will, by default, send you an 11-87 extractor that is thicker and will not fit in the old style bolt and extractor notch.

    All the new 1100s are really "11-87 hybrids" and use the 11-87 bolt, extractor and the newer barrels all have the wider, extractor notch.
     
  6. Steve-CT

    Steve-CT TS Member

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  7. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    A diagram would go great with this, All the points of attention.
     
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