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1100 info

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by jmac_cope, May 18, 2010.

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  1. jmac_cope

    jmac_cope Active Member

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    Can the year of manufacture of a Remington 1100 be determined by the serial number?
    If so does anyone have an idea as to when L362248M might have been manufactured?

    Thanks

    John
     
  2. jmac_cope

    jmac_cope Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
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    Can the year of manufacture of a Remington 1100 be determined by the serial number?
    If so does anyone have an idea as to when L362248M might have been manufactured?

    Thanks

    John
     
  3. gkinla

    gkinla Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    78
    Call Remington (800) 243-9700...give them the s/n and they will give the exact date manufactured.

    Gkinla
     
  4. jmac_cope

    jmac_cope Active Member

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    thank you! they advised me March 1971

    Good info.
    JOHN
     
  5. SonoraMike

    SonoraMike TS Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2010
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    127
    taken from the "Rem 1100 notes" pdf file:

    Roughly the oldest ones from the early to mid 60s (c.1965) will have no prefix letter in front of the serial number, as they were all 12-gauge receivers. The serial numbers will be fairly low. The 1960s and early 1970s guns will have the receiver roll mark cleaner, deeper and thinner than the 1980s guns. Part of the roll mark on the earlier guns will extend to a very small part of the receiver above the "slot" cut into the receiver for the bolt handle to ride in. The earliest guns also have wooden magazine plugs, steel, cup shaped magazine followers (also on the 870) and the triggers were more nicely made and many have
    "ALCOA" embossed on them. Lastly, the forend support on the older 1100s™ was a flat piece of milled steel that never breaks. The common ones encountered today are a cheap piece of stamped springy metal that will break after about 2,000 - 3,000 rounds (but is replaceable in fifteen seconds.)

    As the decade turns into the 1970s, they started putting letter prefixes in front of the serial numbers. The most common are "L", "M" and "N" (current 1100s are using "R" prefixes). L is early to mid 70s. M is later 70s, maybe very early 80s and N early to mid 80s. Production ceased around 1986 because of the advent of the 11-87 and was resumed recently (albeit as an 1100™/11-87 hybrid).

    The suffix "V" at the end of the serial number means 12-gauge.

    Also, the earlier 1100s will have the bolt handle secured by engaging a ball bearing into a dimple visible on the flat, underside of the bolt handle stem. 90% of the 1100s (and all 11-87s) you will see will have the ball bearing in back of and on the edge of that bolt handle stem (there will be an obvious cut
    into the bolt handle stem for this. These bolt handles will also have the "dimple" on the flat underside, too so that they may be used with an old 1100 that has the old style action bar.
     
  6. jmac_cope

    jmac_cope Active Member

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    Wow! Great info. Thanks
     
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