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.........1100 gas system.......

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by vmeter, Apr 29, 2013.

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  1. vmeter

    vmeter TS Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
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    I am not a gunsmith so please excuse the nomenclature. I have 1100 youth 20 gauge that is not cycling or ejecting after its shot. This is not do to being dirty, being clean, being dry, or being lubricated. I tried all of those. I was wandering if it might need a new gas piston seal. A friend at the gun club said they make an updated piston seal that is stainless and longer. This piece fits around the magazine tube. Gun was new in 1992. Maybe 20000 rounds shot. Looking for suggestions from the vast knowledge of T.S.

    Thanks, Justin
     
  2. jm1079

    jm1079 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,763
    First thing I would do is check the O ring. JM
     
  3. twoatlow8

    twoatlow8 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    411
    I would replace the o ring with the brown Vitron style. I had the same problem with a NOS 410 the o ring was hard as a rock. I replaced it and it works like a champ!
     
  4. trw

    trw Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    153
    It is probably the recoil spring that needs replacing and the tube that it rides in is likely fouled with junk or the small piston that goes between the recoil spring and the 'tuning fork' is slightly bent and is binding in the recoil spring tube. Remington used aluminum for some of those pistons at one time and they bend & then bind. If it is aluminum, replace it with a steel one. That was Remington's fix as well. As a rule the recoil spring should be replaced about every 5K rounds as they compress over time and stretching them once they have taken a 'set' is not a fix. Wear safety glasses at all times when removing springs and working on guns or anything mechanical in general and if you need concise instructions how to do it correctly, the NRA has good step by step publications on firearm assembly that will keep you from harm or doing something wrong. Obviously, you should get the one that covers 1100's.

    Replacing the 0-ring once a year is a good idea as well, but I doubt it is your problem unless it is cut or badly burned. The magazine tube's outer needs to be clean w/a light film of lube for best function. I do not see that the new snap together gas piston assy is any better or even as good as the older two piece units. They may be cleaned w/a small brass brush and be sure that the ring gaps are opposite one another and not lined up when you re-install them. Is there a chance that you have the two pieces not together correctly? Might double check that first. The part that fits against the action bar is flat and the end/side facing the forearm cap is convex, next the other piece has a taper on one side, that end goes toward the reciever, then the 0-ring goes on last before replacing the forearm. If those parts are not installed correctly, the gun will not cycle.

    Another issue not oft mentioned is that the chamber needs to be very clean and have a reasonable polish or finish, particularly when shooting today's steel headed ammuniton which does not have any 'spring' to it or 'memory' like brass did and if the chamber is at all rough, the cases will stick to some extent and it interferes with the gun's ability to cycle correctly. It is particularly noticable on 20's.

    Perhaps something here will be of use to you. Let us know what you find.
     
  5. Avatar

    Avatar TS Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2013
    Messages:
    303
    Good advice above. Echoing it, I would:

    --Check main mechanisms to make sure no parts are broke or binding. You can get some idea of this by pulling back bolt with lever to lock in open position, then releasing by hitting release underneath, then doing over again.

    --Remove forearm and barrel. Play around with the piston/action bar assembly to see if it pushes back the bolt assembly without anything binding. Look for broken or bent parts.

    --See if shell goes into and out of chamber of barrel easily (use a snap shell or empty shell). Make sure little hole or holes in barrel that vent gas into the piston are not blocked.

    --Make sure the piston ring assembly is on the right way around. See if O-ring is intact and in its groove (usually will work even if not in the best of shape, at least on my 12ga). Check that piston assembly slides up and down smoothly on the magazine tube--i.e., not too gummed up.

    Gas guns run dirty, and I've had gummed up works eventually stopping the gun from cycling, especially with light loads. Twice, I've had my 1100 12ga stop cycling because of broken parts--once when one "tine" of the link broke, once when a bar of the action bar assembly broke. BTW, when I replaced the link, I noticed the little cup the link "tines" go into to push back the action spring inside of the stock tube was chewed up (probably the aluminum version mentioned above); so I took off the stock and replaced that and the spring, too. The spring and tube actually were quite clean and probably didn't need to be bothered, but mine is an old trap gun not used for hunting.

    Don't take everything apart unless really necessary. I suspect something quite simple and obvious (once you notice it) is broken or wrong. Good luck :)
     
  6. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    9,226
    Location:
    Mesquite, Nevada
    Have you checked the gas ports in the barrel? They can become clogged and cause problems also.

    Hap
     
  7. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    15,643
    Location:
    Green Bay Wisconsin
    gas ports.

    Powder residue cakes on and recduces the hole size.

    Get a set of number drills and a pin vise and start with one that fits, increasing the size till you get to the metal.

    I say a pin vise because it's easy to be ham fisted with a battery drill, and you haven't live till you have to remove a broken drill bit from a gas port. Don't ask me how I know this.

    HM
     
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