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1100 end of season maintenence

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by revbook, Sep 18, 2011.

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  1. revbook

    revbook Member

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    1100 Shooters,

    As the first full year of shooting my Remington 1100 Classic Trap comes to an end I was wondering what I should be replacing on the gun to keep it in good shape for next season. I know there are various springs and such that are open to wear, but what should I be looking at for replacement?

    Don
     
  2. kiv-c

    kiv-c Member

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    Take a look at the website listed above, as well as at http://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?f=55&t=91897

    Kiv
     
  3. mrskeet410

    mrskeet410 TS Member

    Joined:
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    New main action spring every 10,000 rounds.

    Good cleaning every winter, including gas bleed holes in the barrel. Since I've started shooting wet with BreakFree CLP I can skip cleaning the gas bleed holes.

    I run an old toothbrush around the inside of the receiver.

    I used put in a new O-ring every winter, but I'm not sure it's necessary if it hasn't broken. Anybody know?
     
  4. GBatch_25

    GBatch_25 Active Member

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    Illinois
    There was a thread on here a while ago titled "Remington 1100 notes" and it had pix of disassembly and suggestions for cleaning. Try a search for that in the archives. Also, someone here posted it on a website somewhere, but I do not have the URL link.

    Kind of wish David could post it to the permanent threads at the top since there are so many questions that pop up about the 1100.

    If you cannot find it, PM me with your email address and I can email you a copy, complete with photos.

    Gene Batchelar
    Wheaton, IL
     
  5. revbook

    revbook Member

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    Thanks KIV-C that's some good stuff there.

    Don
     
  6. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    1100 springs are cheap. Each year I replace the action spring & magazine tube spring. At the same time giving each tube a good cleaning with breakfree.
     
  7. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    The action, hammer, and return springs are all a good idea. I wait until the fork breaks and then replace it. Some seem to last far longer then others. Get thge e-mail from SSeitz007. That was a great tool and I wish I had kept it.

    That said... Making sure your gas ports are clean and really cleaning your magazine tube each time you shoot as well as new springs once a year will ensure your gun will cycle when you need it to do so. The guy reccomends not using steel wool on the magazine tube but I always do. The cleaner the better in regards to the magazine tube and I have no intention of holding on to a gun for 20 years.

    I am not in the habit of trying to get 20 years out of an autoloader. Mine is to shoot one for 40,000 rounds and sell it, I keep the wood and the barrel. and buy a used field gun and part it out, just keeping the action. To each his own. I am not married to an 1100. I will continue to shoot the guns 30 to 40 thousand and then replace the actions. Far cheaper then any repair bills. Jeff
     
  8. kiv-c

    kiv-c Member

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    Jeff,
    I use the Frontier pad on the mag tubes of both my Super-X and 1100. Takes the gas residue off with nary a scratch on either the blued or stainless tubes. The pad lasts forever, too!

    Kiv
     
  9. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    I switch from liquid Break-Free to spray on Break-Free in the fall. If the winter is really cold I'll use military oil for cold conditions (LAW oil Light Arctic Weapons oil). I'll sometimes shoot trap practice, but this especially applies to my hunting 1187s.
     
  10. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    Near but not in chicago
    I've had my 1100 for 40 years shot it all season long. I clean and oil it after each use. Have never replaced any springs and the 0-ring twice. The gun is almost bullet proof( pun intented)
     
  11. valmet

    valmet TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Location:
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    i've had this info in a file since july of 2007, none of it came from me, i just copied and saved it over the years. dennis...






    "Gene B. posted these in a link from old posts here, years ago from myself and others. I thought it would be a good idea to post these ideas again since there is no "sticky" post. Please copy and distribute to anyone who shoots an 1100 or an 11-87. The tips below do help.

    The trick to 1100 longevity is as follows:

    1. Change the action spring in the stock every 10,000 rds (some say 5,000, but I've been getting 20-25 yrs of service life going every 10,000) This is far more important than changing the buffer disc at the back of the bolt and prevents bolt to receiver impact (from the spring tension offering resistance against the bolt's reward travel) A new action spring is 15" long from the factory before it is installed and compressed. 14-1/2" means - it's time to replace.

    2. GREASE the top, exterior surface of the barrel extension doing this, forms a cheap, "gel" cushion that soaks up the metal to metal impact of the top of the barrel extension against the inner surface of the receiver top caused by vibrations during firing.

    3. Grease the bottom flat surface of the outside of the barrel that presses against the foream support (spring steel bushing) doing so will DOUBLE the service life of that fragile part.

    4. Grease the surfaces of the receiver where the forend support bites into - again reduces some wear and soaks up vibrations

    5. After about 100,000 rounds - switch to a locking lug marked with an etched "L" (for large, or long). This takes up the space worn by the friction of the standard lug against the barrel extension over time. Once that recess becomes sufficiently worn, you will get more "peen" impact of the locking lug as its fit becomes loosened and is allowed to whack the barrel extension harder due to the increased space it has to move in. Once you do this, you're good for about another 100,000 rds after that, you may need a new barrel. Tell tale signs of worn locking lug recesses include: primers backing out of factory shells. I've worn at least two barrels this way and have replaced a few for other people as well over the years.

    6. Inspect the gas cylinder for "ridge burrs" Ridge burrs form from the ring friction from the action bar sleeve driving everything home, hard. Smoothing them out, carefully prevents "train wrecking" of the action bar/action bar sleeve/bolt assembly - all that inertia driven by the action spring slamming the piston and piston seal, home into the "collar" or more properly, GAS CYLINDER - driving the rings into the cylinder - hard - and then having the rings get "tripped up" on ridge burrs that formed inside the gas cylinder. Smoothing out those burrs - will DOUBLE the service life of the piston and piston seal.

    7.DO NOT make a habit of using STEEL WOOL or metal abrasives on the magazine tube to clean it. Doing so, WILL over time, reduce the OD (outside diameter) of the mag tube enough to cause, loose ring fit and hence, GAS LOSS leading to irreparable functioning problems. Instead, use rags and solvents, wipe dry and put a drop or two of BREAK FREE on the tube. If you have enough caked on crud to scrape off, use a PLASTIC edged tool, like a disposable plastic picnic knife or other similar NON METAL MARRING plastic tool (expired cut up credit card or something) to scrape carbon residue from the tube.

    8. ALWAYS put ONE drop of BREAK FREE or similar lube on the center of the firing pin spring where it is stressed the most.

    9. Using a Q-TIP - NOT your fingers - GREASE the underside, flat surfaces of the receiver rails that contact the front part of the link (the "wing" part of the link) Doing this will reduce friction wear and lengthen service life of both the link, and the receiver. Also, new links should be polished, deburred and lubed to prevent burr "snags" during cycling-which leads to broken links and greasing the rails reduces friction wear and the thinning out of the rails which, over time, allows for more MOVEMENT of the link during the firing cycle, which leads to premature link breakage

    10. Lube the white spots on the action bar and grease the "fracture point" on the right leg of the action bar.

    Replace the link if not broken - after 5,000 shots before entering a serious tournament; replace the firing pin retractor spring at 5,000; the extractor at 10,000, the action spring at 10,000, the piston rings at 5,000 and the forend supports and rubber vitron barrel seal at 3,000 rds to enhance reliability.

    Also, when removing the recoil pad, stock or action spring - DO NOT bear down with your weight against the butt, and the mag tube end against the floor - that will stress the mag tube and lead to prematurely separating the mag tube from the receiver, causing it to be junked.

    Following these proven steps along with regular cleaning, and your 1100 is highly unlikely to break down on the line. Mine has not broken down at a trap shoot in over ten years.
     
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