1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

1100 eating it's barrel

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by luvtrapguns, Dec 28, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,900
    Location:
    FL
    1100 eating it

    I have a beautiful Rem 1100 Trap (LH) cica 1979. I bought the gun new and have used it very little (approx 2000 shells since new), having been in storage for the past 29 yrs. I recently brought the gun, and myself, out of retirement for a renewed go at trap. All componnents of gun appear as new (more than I can say about myself).

    And now the problem: After a day of shooting (50-100 shots) I find small metal chips in the receiver and trigger group. Extensively cleaned after each use, the chips appear again with further use. It looks as though the bolt locking lug is slowly chiseling away at it's mating notch in the barrel as the mechanism is automatically forced open when fired. I'm afraid continued firing would destroy the barrel (lock-up notch) to the point in may be unsafe to shoot. The barrel is a Stan Baker modified barrel and as such is not replaceable. I would like to find a fix before that happens. I will not shoot it further until I find a fix.

    I would prefer to find the specific cause and not just indiscriminately throw parts at it. ANY IDEAS?

    PS: I have added pictures, in addition to these two, in a latter post dated 1/1/10 below. You will be able to see the condition I talk about.

    <a href="http://s274.photobucket.com/albums/jj271/mbunk/?action=view¤t=1100BOLT003.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>

    <a href="http://s274.photobucket.com/albums/jj271/mbunk/?action=view¤t=1100BOLT-2001.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>

    I'm leary of rounding the leading edge of locking lug without expert advice. Could there be something else wrong that is not retracting the lug fully? Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks, Marc
     
  2. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,900
    Location:
    FL
    Ikey, Thanks but that is not the cause in this case. Cap is always tightened securely and rechecked often. When assembled there is no noticeable slack between barrel and receiver. Marc
     
  3. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,411
    It would appear that the barrel was not properly fitted. Safety wise I do not think you have a problem. But to be on the safe side there is a test you can do. Close the bolt on an empty chamber, then take a wooden dowel and insert it down the barrel from the muzzle end. When it reaches the bolt face try to push the bolt open with the dowel. If you can't push the bolt open with the dowel the locking lug is still doing its job.

    Another thing you can do is to take a black magic marker and paint the engagement surfaces. Then work the action a few times inorder to locate the surfaces that need to be fitted. After you see what needs to be fitted you can decide whether you want to do the job yourself or give it to a gunsmitth.

    Or you can shoot the gun and let the locking lug fit itself. HMB
     
  4. Robb

    Robb Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    827
    I have an 1100 bolt with the locking lug stamped with an "R". Can't remember if it is over or under sized. I do know it is different though. Maybe someone will chime in. A different lug might fix your problem.
     
  5. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,900
    Location:
    FL
    HMB, The barrel is the same that originally came from the factory with the gun. I sent the barrel to Baker for back boring, forcing cone, and chokes. I think, but not sure, that he sent me back the same barrel.

    The part of the barrel that is being chiseled away is the surface that is parallel to the bore just aft of the lug notch. I have attached a photo, both here and to my original post. Thanks, Marc

    <a href="http://s274.photobucket.com/albums/jj271/mbunk/?action=view¤t=1100BOLT-2001.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>
     
  6. Bob_K

    Bob_K Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,478
    Location:
    Afton, Virginia
    hmb: A slight polish on the locking bolt sharp edge won't hurt anything.

    Robb: The oversized locking bolt should be stamped "CR". Perhaps the "C" is very faint.

    A very good reference to have is the Remington Shop Manual by Jerry Kuhnhatsen.
     
  7. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,411
    I would leave the locking lug alone and just clean up the rough edges on the barrel. HMB
     
  8. Robb

    Robb Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    827
    Bob K, You jogged my memory as I remember seeing lugs Stamped "CR". The one that I have has only the 'R" and it is quite distinct. Now I don't know what I have. I do have Kuhnhausen's book and will check. At any rate I was just trying to help a guy out.
     
  9. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,900
    Location:
    FL
    All parts are original. The locking lug notch top surface is actually being chiseled away, reducing the depth of the notch. This is much more than a simple polishing effect. Thanks, Marc
     
  10. sliverbulletexpress

    sliverbulletexpress TS Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2009
    Messages:
    2,645
    What shells are you using?

    Check that the barrel ports haven't been enlarged. Check the headspace. Check for wear on the receiver rails.

    It looks to me like it is unlocking under pressure. If you can't find anything you might try using a magnum action bar sleave to slow it down but that's a bandaid.

    A little shining in that area is ok but shearing chunks out is not.
     
  11. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,722
    Look at the lug that centers the Bbl into the reciever, what condition is it in? Is it worn or missing, looks like the Bbl is not properly aligned.


    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  12. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    Check to see if there is something in the area of the firing pin that would prevent the locking lug from completely dropping down, causing it to foul on the edge and chip it. Make sure the firing pin isn't bent.
     
  13. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    15,642
    Location:
    Green Bay Wisconsin
    I have had to remove a burr from thazt area on one gun. I would not be afraid to have my expert welder guy tig it and use a dremel to restore the original profile.

    He is so good he even tigged a brass lever on an outboard for me, building it up.

    But Remington should get the first inquiry.

    HM
     
  14. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,900
    Location:
    FL
    My first thought was to send it to Remington but since the barrel was modified from original I was told (by outsiders) that they would not touch it. All parts look as new, no wear showing even to the blueing on steel parts that slide against each other.

    I appreciate all responses given. Gun has not been shot enough to create any wear patterns. All parts except barrel lug notch appear as new.

    I have another complete LH 1100 TB I will swap all parts with except bbl and receiver. If this stops the metal chips I will just order a new set of parts. If not, It will have to go to a good gunsmith.

    Thanks, Marc
     
  15. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    Save yourself some effort. Use layout dye (machinists blue) on the exposed metal on the barrel. Then swap bolt assemblies between the two guns. Check to see if there is a strike pattern on the layout dye.
     
  16. GordonWood421

    GordonWood421 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    287
    It could be that on some occassions , the locking block is not fully engaged into the barrel's locking recess and only the tip of the lug is against the rear wall of the recess .That would create excessively high stress on the edge where you have lost part of the corner .

    You might want to disassemble the bolt to check if there is wear/damage on the under part of the locking block and check the rear of the action bar for wear/damage .

    Look for anything that might contribute to the locking block not being raised completely into the recess .

    Charlie
     
  17. kirbythegunsmith

    kirbythegunsmith Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Messages:
    192
    The barrel locking notch pictured is not what might be considered an abnormal appearance for a barrel with some use, but I do specially rework parts in order to minimize the scraping wear as part of my comprehensive action smoothing work for these and many other makes and models.

    The locking block can have a tiny edge break or edge polish to reduce the scraping, but the lesser the amount of metal removed to eliminate the sharp edge, the better. I use techniques geared towards minimal removal for maximal improvement by leaving as much parent (original) metal in place with only the burrs and sharp edges blended or removed. That way the original clearances are not materially increased, but the wear life (longevity) and reliability are markedly increased.

    You don't have a condition of firing without sufficient locking engagement since the hammer is blocked if the bolt is not fully seated (as well as the trigger disconnector, when properly functioning, is also keeping it's connection apart until the same amount of closure). Proper parts will also block the firing pin travel if other parts noted have failed or been mis-fitted by a goof.

    Other issues could be present that might not be easily noticed or seem relevant to shooters, as opposed to gunsmiths, so don't beat yourself up for not realizing this typical wear pattern (will vary across a range due to manufacturing realities) but do recognize that I (as well as some other talented gunsmiths) can make the overall mechanism much better. I tell shooters that I am going to make their gun better than it was and reduce wear to a very low level.

    I have developed my 1100 smoothing work for more than 2 decades starting even before I opened my own shop.

    Kirby
     
  18. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    14,695
    Location:
    NW Wisconsin
    The poster (luvtrapguns) tells us right off the bat what the problem is.

    The Baker Big Bore is not the match he hoped for.
     
  19. redhawk44

    redhawk44 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    552
    Location:
    Mendon, Mi
    If it was mine, I would send it off to Remington. It is hard to tell from the photo how much the depth of the locking recess has been reduced, but we know that it keeps getting worse and eventually it will become critical.

    My guess is that the steel in that area is a little too soft and the harder locking bolt is scraping some metal off with each shot.

    Do you see the small dimple just inside the white circle in the second photo? That looks to me like a depression made by a Rockwell hardness tester and I doubt that Remington did that. I would suspect that someone annealed this part of the barrel for some reason.
     
  20. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    Messages:
    811
    redhawk44 may be onto something here. You didn't seem too sure that you actually got your own barrel back. I would talk to the person who did the work and find out if you possibly got an exchange barrel either by mistake or on purpose. Seems to me that if you fired approx. 2,000 rounds thru it without any problems, You had barrel work done, and now after 150 rounds you have a problem, and the work you describe having done should not be the cause, you should not have this problem described. Maybe I am missing something here, but this whole picture seems to defy logic, or at least the way I am trying to apply logic.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page

870 locking notch scraping

,

breaking locking lug edge kuhnhausen