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110 volt or 220 volt shotmaker

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by phirel, Feb 4, 2007.

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  1. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I would prefer 220 volt service but if you do not have it readily available, 110 will do. The expense of adding a 220 line might not be worth the advantages. I only load my new AA cases 3-4 times. The primary reason is that I have lots of them. You should get many more reloads than I do. When the ends get black and split, it is time to throw them away. I believe some will jump on this thread and post the danger of the base wad coming out of the AA cases. It appears that Winchester has taken care of this problem.

    Pat Ireland
     
  2. lots of 24's

    lots of 24's Member

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    Dont have any experience with the 220 Volt systems but if you dont have it readily available, I wouldnt go to all the additional expense. The 110 volt systems work just fine.

    The wads I like best to use with AA's are the blue dusters. They are just like the WAA12 only made with different materials. The orange WT-12 also worked well for me.

    Good luck with your shotmaking and your reloading.
     
  3. 320090T

    320090T Well-Known Member

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    A guy at our club yesterday has a 220 and he says it is too hot and needs a thermostat. He is looking to put an electric stove type on it for better heat control. I have used a 110 and had to "help" it with a propane torch once and a while.
     
  4. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    The higher the voltage the less current the ciruit draws. Unless there is a current limitation on the circuit where the unit will be used it won't make any difference. If two units are used on the same circuit along with anything else it makes sense to go 220v to avoid an overload. For most 110v would be more handy.
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Jimmy Borum - I am again asking you to be my electrical consultant. I know that a 220 V shot maker will not get hotter than an identical one served by 110, but I was under the impression that the 220 V circuit would be more efficient in terms of $ to run the thing. Is this correct?
    Thanks
    Pat Ireland
     
  6. DeVille

    DeVille Member

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    I bought my first unit in 1982 at the spring grand from Jerry,s brother who had a display there. Not long after that I changed to a 220 unit (3 of them) and used them side by side with a 3 way electric cord that I plugged into the dryer box. Ran over 7 tons sense than with no trouble. 220 was the best way for me to go. Burnt out 2 heating elements in that period of time and just ran up to Littleton's place and replaced them. The later element were a little better than the first ones. Dex
     
  7. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Jimmy Borum/and others - First, please excuse both my lack of knowledge and any incorrect terms I might use. It is my understanding that my home is supplied with two 110 phases, each entering into a separate metal bar in the back of my breaker box. I was told that my electric meter reads whichever bar is drawing the most power. If I hook a 220 shotmaker to my box, it would be drawing equal power from both 110 supply bars in the box. I use a 110 shotmaker, all power would come from one of the bars and this should make my meter spin faster. Have I been mislead?

    I do appreciate the electrical information I have learned in the past on this site. Of course, it could make me more dangerous.

    Pat Ireland
     
  8. imissone

    imissone TS Member

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    I need some help here. I have searched and read most of the message on shotmaking but everything is in bits and pieces. Is there a how to do this from start to finish? When you get done with making your shotmaker setup how much have you spent$$$? For those out there that are doing it now how much did you spend to get where you are now?

    What is the process needed to do this.I am new to this, so I am looking at what I would need to start doing this. Start with #1. Collect wheel weights from local car or tire shops. 2. Buy a lead melting pot.( which is the best one?, 110volts or 220volts?). Melt lead and make 3oz ingits.3. Next buy a Littleton shot maker. Put ingits into Shot maker and start making shot.(Why do they use a 175' tower and we just have to use the Littleton Shotmaker? 4. What comes next, coolant tank? Why do you need a mixer? Why do you need to put the shot into this and what do you add to your mixer? Can you tell me what else I will need to make my own shot? Also what does it cost you to make your own shot? Right now I am buying it at $24.00 but I know it's going up. At the Trading Post they are selling it At $30.00 a bag. imissone



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  9. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    Like some others, I too have gained some shocking new insight to electrical problems on this forum.






    Jim
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Again, thank you Jimmy. And, I do not think I want to know anything about 3 phase. I have my hands and head full with two phase.

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    wireguy, I'm not very familiar with Littleton shotmakers but they won't have two coils wired in series. They would be in parallel.
     
  12. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    wireguy / Jimmy - You have just reduced the phases I thought I had by 50%. I feel like I am getting phased out, but thanks for teaching me.

    Pat Ireland
     
  13. DeVille

    DeVille Member

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    Wireguy/Jimmy - Thanks for the good reading but I might be one of those guys that should not be handling a fire arm, as Wireguy put it. All I know is that in the 24 years that I ran lead on my 3 - 220 volt units, I just plugged each one into a 3 way pigtail. Than plugged that into the 220 volt heater plug. Each unit had a on/off switch and each unit had double drippers except the end ones which were single. It was all I could do to keep up with them. Only run them when it was hot and when I had a ton or ton and half of lead. Only run the units about 6 or 7 batches during those years. So plinker61 I would recommend the 220 volt units. Dex
     
  14. omahasportingsupply

    omahasportingsupply TS Member

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    Lee melting pots draw 700 watts in the 110v model.
    " " " " 500 " " the 220v model.

    700w /110v = 6.3 amps
    500w /240v = 2.08 amps

    Size your wire according to how many watts the Littleton draws and which voltage you are using.
     
  15. straycat

    straycat TS Member

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  16. Dale Z

    Dale Z TS Member

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    I'm sure you would be much happier with the 220 volt model, and I would be much happier to upgrade your electrical service for you. Maybe then I could attend a few more shoots!!!

    Dale Z
     
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