Home Forum Links Sponsors
 Frames Version - Webtv Version

Please visit and patronize our advertisers whose support helps maintain this site!           
What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
Trapshooters.com Home Page

Back to the Trap Discussion Web

What Gunsmiths Hate to See...

Most Recent Posts First

Jump to First Post

Hide Deleted Messages

Posted By Posted Date/Time
ColtM1911A1 28-Jun-11 - 10:46 AM ET
TOOLMAKER 251 28-Jun-11 - 10:51 AM ET
Rastoff 28-Jun-11 - 10:55 AM ET
timb99 28-Jun-11 - 10:57 AM ET
ColtM1911A1 28-Jun-11 - 11:16 AM ET
Traders 28-Jun-11 - 11:45 AM ET
Traders 28-Jun-11 - 11:46 AM ET
ColtM1911A1 28-Jun-11 - 12:02 PM ET
blkcloud 28-Jun-11 - 12:09 PM ET
Unknown1 28-Jun-11 - 12:09 PM ET
ColtM1911A1 28-Jun-11 - 12:20 PM ET
cubancigar2000 28-Jun-11 - 12:26 PM ET
Rastoff 28-Jun-11 - 12:32 PM ET
BROWNST100 28-Jun-11 - 12:34 PM ET
N. J. BOB 28-Jun-11 - 01:01 PM ET
ColtM1911A1 28-Jun-11 - 01:26 PM ET
JerryP 28-Jun-11 - 01:31 PM ET
mrskeet410 28-Jun-11 - 01:38 PM ET
ColtM1911A1 28-Jun-11 - 01:46 PM ET
100straight 28-Jun-11 - 02:02 PM ET
ColtM1911A1 28-Jun-11 - 02:04 PM ET
ColtM1911A1 28-Jun-11 - 02:20 PM ET
letts 28-Jun-11 - 02:24 PM ET
kiv-c 28-Jun-11 - 02:24 PM ET
ColtM1911A1 28-Jun-11 - 02:35 PM ET
kiv-c 28-Jun-11 - 02:38 PM ET
sliverbulletexpress 28-Jun-11 - 03:04 PM ET
Rastoff 28-Jun-11 - 03:18 PM ET
BROWNST100 28-Jun-11 - 03:47 PM ET
9point3 28-Jun-11 - 04:58 PM ET
motordoctor 28-Jun-11 - 05:23 PM ET
9point3 28-Jun-11 - 05:41 PM ET
sliverbulletexpress 28-Jun-11 - 05:46 PM ET
JerryP 28-Jun-11 - 05:46 PM ET
kiv-c 28-Jun-11 - 10:48 PM ET
Brian in Oregon 29-Jun-11 - 01:26 AM ET
sliverbulletexpress 29-Jun-11 - 11:17 AM ET
grntitan 29-Jun-11 - 11:25 AM ET
GunDr 29-Jun-11 - 01:18 PM ET
William Perry 29-Jun-11 - 05:14 PM ET
grntitan 29-Jun-11 - 05:29 PM ET
snapthecat 29-Jun-11 - 06:31 PM ET
RWS52 29-Jun-11 - 08:36 PM ET
lbshootin 29-Jun-11 - 08:59 PM ET
Shooting Coach 01-Jul-11 - 05:40 PM ET
ColtM1911A1 02-Jul-11 - 02:44 PM ET


Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: ColtM1911A1
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 10:46 AM ET
Website Address:

1) WD-40 used as a gun lubricant... 2) Spray cans of gun oil on firearm internals... 3) Lubricating trigger groups without disassemble... 4) Worthless cold bluing applications... 5) Finished wood stocks without sealed wood... 6) The use of non-standard parts during repair... 7) Over springing semi-auto pistols and any firearm firing pin spring... 8) Home shop barrel porting (rifle, pistol, or shotgun)... 9) the improper use of metal files anywhere on the firearm...

And finally:

10) The home garage trigger job (on any firearm, but especially handguns)...

This is just a quick list of things I find irritating and sometimes dangerous. Many of them requires me to perform a repair. Gunsmith works takes time and especially experience. As in all aspects of a craft, a man needs to know his limitations. I turn down many repairs if I feel I don't have the time, experience, or the equipment to do the job properly and return a safe and workable gun to the customer. Many times I have returned the firearm to the manufacturers gunsmiths to perform the work....

Just a word here: gun oil is a dirt magnet. Remember that anytime you apply it to a surface. And dirt is abrasive, wearing metal to below safety specs as it grinds away the surface hardening which might only be a few microns deep (a micron is one millionth of a meter). New, modern oils do not need to be seen to be effective; apply, wipe off, and know they have filled in the surface areas to prevent rust and smooth the friction...

Need to get back to work. Just babbling over a cup of coffee during a needed time out reworking a 1911 home trigger job (both sear and disconnect filed incorrectly and leaving the owner with a dangerous and way too light trigger)....good luck

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: TOOLMAKER 251
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 10:51 AM ET
Website Address:

Are you drinking caffeinated coffee?

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: Rastoff
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 10:55 AM ET
Website Address:

When you get a chance, please elaborate on this -

3) Lubricating trigger groups without disassemble...

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: timb99
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 10:57 AM ET
Website Address:

...gun oil is a dirt magnet...

Are you suggesting that we should not lubricate our guns and we should operate them in a dry condition?

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: ColtM1911A1
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 11:16 AM ET
Website Address:

Toolmaker 251 - no comment required. It'sFolgers regular...

Rastoff - from reading this and another forum I think you shoot a Ljutic. In your case, removing a single pin can remove the complete trigger assembly where you can then further take it down, clean each part, lubricate and remove all excess oils, then reassemble and have the best of both worlds; rust protection and a smooth operation without attracting excess and unwanted dirt.

What I mean about lubrication without disassembly: This would be if you took a spray nozzle (or tip of a bottle) and applied the lubricant by and through any opening to the group itself. Fore and aft of the trigger, through the firing pin hole, anywhere that would get oil into the trigger group without taking it apart. Spray and pray, so to speak. In that case, it might be better to leave it be or take it to a smith for a yearly cleaning....

Timb99 - no, but I'm suggesting that it is done correctly. An assembly is not totally dry unless it was taken down and soaked or hand cleaned. Some folks use gun scrubber products to remove excess contamination without disassembly and then try to lubricate again without using excess oils. That's certainly better than the spray and pray approach, but not as effective as the better way...

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: Traders
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 11:45 AM ET
Website Address:

Colt1911A1,

I have always wondered about the use of WD40 on guns. You warn against its use and so has every shooter I have ever asked about this issue. Yet, it is probably one of the most common cleaner/lubricants used on big and small machinery in the US.

I know that over time it will turn waxy/gummy, but so will most other lubricants. What's the difference?

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: Traders
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 11:46 AM ET
Website Address:

Colt1911A1,

I have always wondered about the use of WD40 on guns. You warn against its use and so has every shooter I have ever asked about this issue. Yet, it is probably one of the most common cleaner/lubricants used on big and small machinery in the US.

I know that over time it will turn waxy/gummy, but so will most other lubricants. What's the difference?

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: ColtM1911A1
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 12:02 PM ET
Website Address:

Traders - WD- 40 is a water despersant, designed for that purpose and does that function quite well. The waxy buildup you describe is just the carrier for the chemical itself. In a nutshell, WD-40 is a masterpiece of American marketing. Remember the old advertisements? Don't see them much anymore because the 'word-of-mouth' arena has turned this product into a gangbuster, even if it's used for another purpose than designed. Some people even promote this product for it's aroma, not unlike Hoppes #9, and a few others. Gotta love it!

Instead of WD-40, use a product like CLP or similar - FP-10, etc.....good luck

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: blkcloud
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 12:09 PM ET
Website Address:

Back in 1982 I bought a new 1100 from wal mart.. $297.00.. It was my only repeating shotgun until I bought a citori in 1990.. It has over 7000 shots throught it,and has never had anything other than wd-40 used on it.. That's all I had.. Didnt know you were not supposed to use it.. It still shoots perfect today.. I take it dove hunting on opening day each year..

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: Unknown1
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 12:09 PM ET
Website Address:

WD-40 as a deodorant... hhmmmmmm!

MK

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: ColtM1911A1
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 12:20 PM ET
Website Address:

Blkcloud - you, Sir, have not told the entire story. I'm certain you clean your firearms far more often and thoroughly than many others. Using what you had and doing it correctly without excess is a fine trait. I believe that is what you did - either taught to you or you take pride in your firearms. I would bet the latter...

The 1100is a good dove gun, especially in the sub gauges, either the .410 or 28 gauge, but with proper loads, it will do fine in any gauge....thanks blkcloud for your comments

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: cubancigar2000
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 12:26 PM ET
Website Address:

give me a break

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: Rastoff
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 12:32 PM ET
Website Address:

Thanks for the elaboration. I never thought of spraying any type of product through the firing pin hole. That would be the height of laziness.

Yes, I do shoot a Ljutic. Yes, one of the great features of that gun is a drop out trigger group. Yes, I do take it out to perform any cleaning. I never just soak a trigger group in any kind of lubricant. I think sears should be dry. Pivot points should be oiled. Moving surfaces get grease. No, I don't take my trigger apart to lubricate it. Should I?

Even with that, I have many guns. I prefer guns with removable trigger groups, they are easier to maintain. However, I will take the stock off to get to the triggers.

WD-40 is a great product. It is NOT a lubricant. It will not gum up though many seem to think so. I've seen many tests that say it won't and not one that shows that it will. However, if it is the only product you are using on your gun, it's not enough.

Some gun designs are simple enough to out last even the laziest of owners. I know of one 870 that hadn't been cleaned since the 70s. It finally failed a few months ago; broke the firing pin. Why? There was so much gunk built up in the firing pin channel in the bolt, the pin couldn't move. So, you might get lucky, but if that gun had been maintained even a little, it would still be working fine.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: BROWNST100
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 12:34 PM ET
Website Address:

WD40 does turn a waxy white and I have taken many of bolts, from bolt action guns, apart to clean out the gunk from it. The first night of the first day of rifle season, in freezing cold weather, will show who loads up the bolt of their gun with WD40 and never really cleans it out.

It works within reason.

Vern

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: N. J. BOB
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 01:01 PM ET
Website Address:

The man is giving good sound advice, with years of EVERY DAY experience to back it up.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: ColtM1911A1
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 01:26 PM ET
Website Address:

Rastoff - you don't have to take the Ljutic trigger group down any further to do a good job, just do it on a regular basis. And, be sure you push out the group pin instead of hammering it out as I have seen some do n their Ljutics. I'm certain you know how to do this since you seem to know your way around the Ljutic already.

And I didn't mean to say to soak the parts in oil; I soak or use a sonic unit to deep clean some groups that are a pain to completely disassemble in solvent, solvent designed for just that purpose.

Greasing pivot points is not only good practice, it's mandatory for some areas. Simple oil viscosity is inadequate to handle the tight opening and closingof certain hinges on many O/U and SBT guns. If measured properly, you would be surprised at the amount of inch/ pounds generated by these tight hinged firearms. It doesn't feel like much, but regardless, those areas need high viscosity grease, not oil. Oil will work, but it will also cause sooner wear points and turn that nice, tight gun into a sloppy one in less years than it should. And then come the main hinge pin replacement and a four figure check written out to the manufacturer years before it would have been necessary, if at all.

Vern - excellent point, however, some never hunt in the sub- zero conditions you or I do every year. Talk about stiff actions and frozen gunk in the firing pin channel and not even a 'click' when the trigger is pulled. BTW, sun-zero temperatures is the one time I would recommend running the trigger group dry or lubing with a dry graphite. This will negate the frozen firing pin channels and/or springs.

Cubancigar2000 - I usually smoke Partagus D 4's if you have any extras lying about. And you may take a break and have one of those beauties. I certainly like your name. I think I'll have a Cuban tonight. Thanks for lighting the lamp...

N. J. Bob - appreciate the kind words, if they were meant for me and not one of the other responders. Anyhow, thanks for reading the post...

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: JerryP
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 01:31 PM ET
Website Address:

WD-40 will most definately gum up the works if applied liberally and allowed to dry. I once had to pound open a Hi-Standard 22 with a block of wood in the Spring after applying WD-40 in the Fall. But it is a great rust preventitive and cleaner. Just wipe it down with a rag, it is a good product but not a lube.

...gun oil is a dirt magnet... Don't play with your guns in the sand box.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: mrskeet410
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 01:38 PM ET
Website Address:

Colt1911A - On the rare and unusual instances I give a trigger group the canned Gun Scrubber treatment, after drying I give it a very light spray with Rem Oil. What do you suggest I use for minor lubing and rust preventative if not Rem Oil?

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: ColtM1911A1
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 01:46 PM ET
Website Address:

Good story, JerryP, and another reason to use the correct products when working/solving a problem. Again, WD-40 says it all in it's name:

Water Dispersant -40. The 40 might mean it was the 40th mixture that finally proved to be the one they were looking for. Or, most likely, it means something totally meaningless and just sounded good to the marketing department - a nice sounding technical term that the buying public might be drawn toward. And, boy, did it work and still works. But the word is getting out there and that's a good thing....good luck

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: 100straight
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 02:02 PM ET
Website Address:

My gunsmith doesn't hate these things at all. As a matter of fact he refers to them as "job security."

Mark.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: ColtM1911A1
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 02:04 PM ET
Website Address:

Mrskeet410 - it's very hard to give a light spray to any surface. I would suggest using the spray Rem Oil for exterior purposes and use a non-spray lube on the interior, as in trigger groups....

As I said before, a light coating of CLP or similar products (FP-10) pit on with a Q-tip or your fingers (wear a thin latex glove, if you like) and get to the tough areas. Then remove the visible oil with more Q-tips or pipe cleaners. CLP and such oils work at the microscopic levels, filling and protection surfaces in the single digit micron levels. They actually bond with the metal and produce a smooth and protected surface. Think of the steels surface like a road full of holes and cracks. These modern oils (and that is why they cost so much) have such small particles and large surface areas that they are the ultimate in rust protection. They also have a cleaning agent in them to assist in that area as well. That holes and cracked road now becomes a smooth and slick surface which looks dry but is well protected more than the older technology could ever provide...

Hint: Gun a scrubber is nothing more than brake cleaner and carb cleaner in an expensive container. Find these other cleaners on sale and save the extra $5/ can for the name...

Use your other oils and cleaners on the exterior, but use your more expensive modern molecular oils for the critical areas of your firearm. BTW, I still think the military uses CLP on all their firearms, and an equivalent grease of the same name. It's temperature range is some ridiculous figure like 300 degrees plus and 150degrees minus zero and still,operates well in that range....

Spend the extra money on good lubricants. Spending $10 on good oil for your expensive firearms is nothing considering the protection it provides.....good luck

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: ColtM1911A1
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 02:20 PM ET
Website Address:

Like your name, 100 straight, and I understand the humor. It is job security, but I have enough work to do other than cleaning filthy guns and trigger groups. Trust me, my small shop will always have these guns locked in the safe waiting for the day I decide to work on them and skip the good stuff I really enjoy doing. Handing someone a properly cleaned firearm, and a bill for $40+ and then trying not to insult them for their preventive maintenance results is not very fun for me. Now handing someone a well tuned release trigger that they were formally disappointed with is good times. The smile is worth the time and work....

My shop is backlogged now and most are not (thankfully) cleanings. My people are getting the message.....good luck

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: letts
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 02:24 PM ET
Website Address:

I do not be leave what you say about WD 40, I live and hunt In Northern Michigan, I have hunted in Canada and in Montana in rainy as well as sub zero weather with semi auto rifles as well as bolt action with out a problem. I have probably used WD 40 for at least 30 years and I wouldn't consider any other spray lubricant to wipe down my firearms for rust protection. I do use grease where it is recommended.

Letts

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: kiv-c
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 02:24 PM ET
Website Address:

Here's another WD-40 tip: Never, Ever, EVER get it on or even near unfinished or unsealed wood of any kind! It will eventually turn it to mush.

A friend of mine used to douse the barrel and lock on his fancy custom-made flintlock rifle because he was too lazy to do a proper job of cleaning. The WD-40 eventually penetrated right through the breech plug threads and into the wood. I had to dig out all the mush until I hit dry wood, then pinned and acraglassed everything back together. Helluva mess!

Kiv

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: ColtM1911A1
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 02:35 PM ET
Website Address:

I think I'm done here. Been a nice diversion to a rough day in my shop. Thanks, Gentlemen, and talk with you down the road. I just hope this doesn't turn into a WD-40 debate....Good luck

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: kiv-c
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 02:38 PM ET
Website Address:

WD-40 is *NOT* a good rust preventive. Literally dozens of comparison tests have been run over the years showing that WD-40 is usually one of the first coatings to be washed away, allowing rusting and corrosion to begin.

At best, it's a good penetrant, not a good lubricant.

Oh, and it's no good for arthritic joints, either...

Kiv

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: sliverbulletexpress
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 03:04 PM ET
Website Address:

Good gun oil like 3InOne is hard to find anymore, people want to waste their money on fancy stuff.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: Rastoff
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 03:18 PM ET
Website Address:

WD-40 literally stands for Water Displacement, 40th attempt.
From the WD-40 website.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: BROWNST100
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 03:47 PM ET
Website Address:

To get off the WD40 for awhile...

Some of the humor of working in a small sporting goods shop....

1. The guy who came in to buy ammo for his gun and didn't know what caliber or guage and would say "Well I bought the gun here ??? years ago. Can't you look it up?"

2. Always asked what grain in ammo and almost always was the answer..." What is the heaviest one they make--give me a box of those"

3. The guy in such a rush he would pick 270 Weatherby ammo and not 270 Winchester, which his gun was chambered for.

4. The look on peoples faces when you checked the gun they wanted to sell and a live round or more was in it.

5. The guy who got bonus checks at work and never told his wife. Once every couple months he would order some fancy gun and you weren't allowed to call his home to let him know when it came in.

6. Those who spend lots of money on a gun and then would hemmm and hawwww about the price of a scope and mounts and rings and buy a cheapie package and complain about not being real accurate.

I could go on and on

Vern

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: 9point3
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 04:58 PM ET
Website Address:

I call BS on this thread!! Gunsmiths love to see this kind of stuff cause it keeps them in a job.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: motordoctor
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 05:23 PM ET
Website Address:

try PB Blaster. It is a lubricant and a water displacement agent. Only problem is that it smells. Motordoc

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: 9point3
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 05:41 PM ET
Website Address:

Hey ColtM1911A1 The below quoted attitude is why gunsmiths get a bad reputation

If you don't want the work, why take it on?

"Trust me, my small shop will always have these guns locked in the safe waiting for the day I decide to work on them and skip the good stuff I really enjoy doing"

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: sliverbulletexpress
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 05:46 PM ET
Website Address:

Sometimes you're just feeling your oats and just have to have a zipper contest.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: JerryP
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 05:46 PM ET
Website Address:

kiv-c , Apparantly you missed the test that Brownells did which showed WD40 to be a very good rust preventitive. Cite one of your examples to the contrary.

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/lid=10700/learn/Gun_Cleaning_Clinic__Knowing_the_Limits_of_Rust_Preventatives

By the way, Brownells states wd40 as a clp

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: kiv-c
Date: Tue, Jun 28, 2011 - 10:48 PM ET
Website Address:

Jerry, I recall reading a fairly extensive Astm salt spray test that was done in one of the gun mags years back. I thought it was maybe Rifle magazine, but after looking through all my back issues I guess it must have been in Guns & Ammo or Shooting Times, or...?

Anyway, I remember the test was against all the commonly used gun lubes of the day, like Rig Grease, Clenzoil, Eezox, Rem-oil, some milspec lube, CLP, etc.

I don't remember the order exactly, but I do remember being surprised to see Rig, WD-40, and the milspec stuff near the bottom. However, this was after nearly 100 hours of exposure, way more time than any of our guns would be exposed! Even so, WD-40 dropped off my list of gun lubes after that and my previously mentioned experience with it on wood.

My favorite has always been Eezox. Not really a lubricant, but applied correctly it is a superior rust preventer. It's also a great bore cleaner. I discovered that after running a wet patch through a barrel I'd just finished cleaning to what I thought was squeaky clean condition. The patch came out dirty. Took a couple more patches and then it was really clean.

Everybody has a favorite product, though. That's what keeps all those companies in business, right?

Kiv

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: Brian in Oregon
Date: Wed, Jun 29, 2011 - 01:26 AM ET
Website Address:

"Hint: Gun a scrubber is nothing more than brake cleaner and carb cleaner in an expensive container. Find these other cleaners on sale and save the extra $5/ can for the name..."

I've found Gun Scrubber usually won't affect plastic, while brake cleaner and carb cleaner often do.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: sliverbulletexpress
Date: Wed, Jun 29, 2011 - 11:17 AM ET
Website Address: http://sport.birchwoodcasey.com/Maintenance/MaintenanceDetails.aspx?ProductID=b11b242f-f98b-47e3-af3

There used to be two versions of Gun Scrubber one safe for plastics and one that was not. They just have one version now but you might find both still on shelves.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: grntitan
Date: Wed, Jun 29, 2011 - 11:25 AM ET
Website Address:

Carb Cleaner and Brake Cleaner are not the same thing. Carb cleaner will/can leave an oily residue behind where brake clean will not. They both may clean gun parts but they are not the same thing as gun cleaner.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: GunDr
Date: Wed, Jun 29, 2011 - 01:18 PM ET
Website Address:

I do see ColtM1911A1 point but, from a different angle....

When the ol'timer comes into the shop with his m97 or m94 and it doesn't work (sometimes it doesn't open or close) you know you've got your work cut out for ya. The approximate time to tear one of these guns down, clean it, reassemble and test-fire would be a smidgen over an hour.

Now this ol'timer is a vet, and has a fixed income from Soc.Sec.,and your normal rate for a C&O is, say $50. I wouldn't feel comfortable charging him the extra hour or more to scrape the old WD-40(now a varnish or shellac), out of every nook and cranny. There are times when I would just bead-blast the internal parts to knock off the crud, then repolish them up.

I've also have spent an hour working on 22s brought in by the 80 yr old fixed income widow that uses the gun to shoot squirrels off her feeder...most times at N/C.

I personally don't complain about it, its just the way it is.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: William Perry
Date: Wed, Jun 29, 2011 - 05:14 PM ET
Website Address:

Another use for WD-40. I know some hard core saltwater fishermen who spray it on their trolling lures. They claim it's scent attracts fish. Haven't tried it myself. But I do know the Maryland State Police said they couldn't use it on their weapons.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: grntitan
Date: Wed, Jun 29, 2011 - 05:29 PM ET
Website Address:

"I know some hard core saltwater fishermen who spray it on their trolling lures"

I'll bet the local Fish and Wildlife Officers are thrilled about this practice. I doubt the chemicals in WD-40 are real Ecofriendly. I would think it would be against the law introducing those chemicals to public water ways. JMHO

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: snapthecat
Date: Wed, Jun 29, 2011 - 06:31 PM ET
Website Address:

WD=40 will rust steel. I once sprayed a choke reamer thoroughly with it, wrapped it in a rag which had been saturated in it. Months later took it out to use it. Surface rust from end to end. I'll never use it on anything else again.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: RWS52
Date: Wed, Jun 29, 2011 - 08:36 PM ET
Website Address:

What gunsmiths hate to see...most trapshooters. We are largely the biggest PIA and don't forget, the cheapest too.

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: lbshootin
Date: Wed, Jun 29, 2011 - 08:59 PM ET
Website Address:

Been using WD40 on lures for years...leaves a nasty slick, but the bass love it...heard along time ago that the active ingredient was anchovie oil...just don't get caught with a can in your boat, big fine for it out here in California, they don't like any type of attractant that leaves a slick on the water!...HeeHee....LB

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: Shooting Coach
Date: Fri, Jul 01, 2011 - 05:40 PM ET
Website Address:

While reading these posts, I had a new one come in yesterday. It seems a 1911 pistol, situated between the seats of a fellow's car, had a milk shake spilled on it.

Folks, this gun was dead in the water! It took a mallet to get the slide to move to the disassembly notch. After a cleaning in the sink, using hot water and soap, then spraying with Rem Oil, it was ready to go. The grips were wiped down with Ballistol, my personal favorite gun oil.

Ragging the customer? NO WAY. Life happens, and since he bought the gun at the shop where I work, no charge.

The gun was parkerized and had zero rust after cleaning. :^)

So you want me to clean your guns for you? SURE THING!!!

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

Subject: What Gunsmiths Hate to See...
From: ColtM1911A1
Date: Sat, Jul 02, 2011 - 02:44 PM ET
Website Address:

Hey, Shooting Coach, try this one. A S&W 686, 4", SS, owned by a backwoods gentleman. Good customer, a real-life 'live-in-the-woods' sort of person. He has plenty of long and short guns, sometimes misplacing them for a time in his truck or house...

Brought in the 686 covered in maple sap from spring syrup time. The sap had hardened to concrete, and unlike processed syrup, hot water doesn't put much of a dent in it, especially in those hard to get to places. About three hours work - no charge being a customer and good guy without very deep pockets. He refused not to pay; I stood firm. He'll get his way somehow, with venison, elk, smoked fish or some such thing. He already gave my family about a years supply of true maple syrup. Hmmm, good....

Email a link to this post - Email a link to this thread

The owners, administrators and moderators of the Trapshooters.com have no obligation to keep objectionable messages off this forum. It is impossible for us to review all messages. All messages express the views of the author, and neither the owners, administrators or moderators of Trapshooters.com Discussion Forum will be held responsible for the content of any message. The owners, administrators and moderators of the Trapshooters.com Discussion Forum reserve the right to remove, edit, move or close any thread for any reason at our sole discretion. However, the owners, administrators and moderators are not monitoring or editing the site and are under no obligation to police it for items that some persons may find objectionable.

[ Back ]

To Register for full access to reply and create threads Click Here!
To Login to the discussion web Click Here!
To report problems with this site email email us